Posts Tagged ‘slaves’

74001 3

ODYSSEY A

And when in his wide courtyards Odysseus had cut down
the insolent youths, he hung on high his sated bow
and strode to the warm bath to cleanse his bloodstained body.
Two slaves prepared his bath, but when they saw their lord
they shrieked with terror, for his loins and belly steamed
and thick black blood dripped down from both his murderous palms
their copper jugs rolled clanging on the marble tiles.
The wandering man smiled gently in his horny beard
and with his eyebrows signed the frightened girls to go.

ΟΔΥΣΣΕΙΑ Α

Σαν πια ποθέρισε τους γαύρους νιους μες στις φαρδιές αυλές του,
το καταχόρταστο ανακρέμασε δοξάρι του ο Δυσσέας
και διάβη στο θερμό λουτρό, το μέγα του κορμί να πλύνει.
Δυο δούλες συγκερνούσαν το νερό, μα ως είδαν τον αφέντη
μπήξαν φωνή, γιατι η σγουρή κοιλιά και τα μεριά του αχνίζαν
και μαύρα στάζαν αίματα πηχτά κι από τις δυο του φούχτες
και κύλησαν στις πλάκες οι χαλκές λαγήνες τους βροντώντας.
Ο πολυπλάνητος γελάει πραγά μες στα στριφτά του γένια
και γνέφει παίζοντας τα φρύδια του στις κοπελλιές να φύγουν.
Το χλιο πολληώρα φραίνουνταν νερό κι οι φλέβες του ξαπλώναν
μες το κορμί σαν ποταμοί, και τα νεφρά του δροσερεύαν
κι ο μέγας νους μες στο νερό ξαστέρωνε κι αναπαυόταν.

~ODYSSEY, by NIKOS KAZANTZAKIS, translated by KIMON FRIAR

Nikos Kazantzakis
1883-1957
Nikos Kazantzakis was born in Heraklion, Crete, when the island was still under Ottoman rule. He studied law in Athens (1902-06) before moving to Paris to pursue postgraduate studies in philosophy (1907-09) under Henri Bergson. It was at this time that he developed a strong interest in Nietzsche and seriously took to writing. After returning to Greece, he continued to travel extensively, often as a newspaper correspondent. He was appointed Director General of the Ministry of Social Welfare (1919) and Minister without Portfolio (1945), and served as a literary advisor to UNESCO (1946). Among other distinctions, he was president of the Hellenic Literary Society, received the International Peace Award in Vienna in 1956 and was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature.
Kazantzakis regarded himself as a poet and in 1938 completed his magnum opus, The Odyssey: A Modern Sequel, divided into 24 rhapsodies and consisting of a monumental 33,333 verses. He distinguished himself as a playwright (The Prometheus Trilogy, Kapodistrias, Kouros, Nicephorus Phocas, Constantine Palaeologus, Christopher Columbus, etc), travel writer (Spain, Italy, Egypt, Sinai, Japan-China, England, Russia, Jerusalem and Cyprus) and thinker (The Saviours of God, Symposium). He is, of course, best known for his novels Zorba the Greek (1946), The Greek Passion (1948), Freedom or Death (1950), The Last Temptation of Christ (1951) and his semi-autobiographical Report to Greco (1961). His works have been translated and published in over 50 countries and have been adapted for the theatre, the cinema, radio and television.

Advertisements
Νυχτερινό λιμάνι
φώτα πνιγμένα στά νερά
πρόσωπα δίχως μνήμη καί συνέχεια
φωτισμένα απ’ τούς περαστικούς προβολείς μακρινών πλοίων
κ’ ύστερα βυθισμένα στή σκιά τού ταξιδιού
λοξά ιστία μέ κρεμασμένες λάμπες ονείρου
σάν τίς ραγισμένες φτερούγες τών αγγέλων πού αμάρτησαν
οι στρατιώτες μέ τίς κάσκες
ανάμεσα στή νύχτα καί στό κάρβουνο
τραυματισμένα χέρια σάν τή συγνώμη πού έφτασε αργά

Αιχμάλωτοι δεμένοι στίς άγκυρες
ένας κρίκος γύρω στό λαιμό τού ορίζοντα
κι άλλες αλυσσίδες εκεί στά πόδια τών παιδιών
καί στά χέρια τής αυγής πού κρατούν μιά μαργαρίτα.

Κ’ είναι τά κατάρτια πού επιμένουνε

νά μετρήσουν τ’ άστρα

μέ τή βοήθεια τής ήρεμης ανάμνησης

—μιά ανθοδέσμη γλάρων στήν αυγινή ευδία.

 

Φεύγει τό χρώμα απ’ τό πρόσωπο τής ημέρας

καί το φώς δέ βρίσκει ένα άγαλμα

νά κλειστεί νά δοξαστεί νά γαληνέψει.

 

Θά υποθάλπουμε λοιπόν ακόμη

τήν ανοιχτή πληγή τού ήλιου

πού αναβρύζει σπόρους λουλουδιών

στήν ίδια πορεία

στήν ίδια ερώτηση

στίς γόνιμες φλέβες τής άνοιξης

που επαναλαμβάνει τούς γύρους τών χελιδονιών

γράφοντας ερωτικά μηδέν

στό ακατανίκητο στερέωμα;

Ποιά πληγή

δέ μάς δωρήθηκε ακόμη

γιά νά συμπληρώσουμε

τού θεού τή θεότητα;


~Γιάννης Ρίτσος

 

Harbor at night
lights drown in the water
faces without memory or continuance
faces lit by passing spotlights of distant ships
and then sunken in the shadow of voyage
slant masts with hanging dream lamps
like the cracked wings of angels who sinned
the soldiers with helmets
between the night and embers
wounded hands like the forgiveness
that reached late

Prisoners tied on anchors
a ring around the horizon’s neck
and other chains there at the feet of children
at dawn’s hands holding a daisy

And it is the masts that insist

to count the stars

with the help of calm memory

– a bouquet of seagulls in the morning blue sky

 

Color deserts the face of day

and light doesn’t find any statue

to dwell in to be glorified to becalm

 

Nevertheless we’ll still shelter

the sun’s open wound

that springs flowers out of seeds

in the same march

in the same question

in the fertile veins of spring

that repeats the swallows’ rounds

writing erotic zeros

in the invincible firmament?

Which wound

hasn’t graced us yet

that we may complement

the godliness of God?

~Yannis Ritsos-Poems, Vancouver, 2011
Translated by Manolis Aligizakis