Posts Tagged ‘home’

Szymborska_2011_(1)

ADVERTISEMENT

I am a tranquilizer.
I am effective at home.
I work well at the office
I take exams
I appear in court
I carefully mend broken crockery—
all you need do it take me
dissolve me under the tongue
all you need do is swallow me
just wash me down with water.

I know how to cope with misfortune
how to endure bad news
take the edge of injustice
make up for the absence of God
help pick out your widow’s weeds
What are you waiting for—
have faith in chemistry’s compassion.

You’re still a young man/woman
you really should settle down somehow.
Who said
life must be loved courageously?

Hand your abyss over to me—
I will line it with soft sleep
You’ll be grateful for
the four-footed landing.

Sell me your soul.
There’s no other buyer likely to turn up.

There’s no other devil left.

ΔΙΑΦΗΜΗΣΗ

Είμαι ναρκωτικό.
Επιδρώ καλά όταν με πιείς στο σπίτι.
Επιδρώ θετικά και στο γραφείο
περνάω εξετάσεις
παρουσιάζομαι στο δικαστήριο
ξανακολλώ σπασμένα κατσαρολικά—
μόνο πρέπει να με πιείς
να λυώσω κάτω απ’ τη γλώσσα σου
μόνο να με καταπιείς
με μια γουλιά νερό

Γνωρίζω να αναιρώ την ατυχία
να υπομένω τα δυσάρεστα νέα
να κάνω πιο ομαλή την αδικία
να εξαλείφω την έλλειψη του Θεού
να ελαφρύνω τον πόνο της χήρας
τί περιμένεις—
έχε εμπιστοσύνη στη συμπόνια της χημείας

Είσαι ακόμα νέα/νέος
καιρός να κατασταλλάξεις κάπου.
Ποιος είπε
ότι πρέπει να ζούμε τη ζούμε με θάρρος;

Έλα δώσε μου την άβυσσό σου
θα την απαλύνω με τον ύπνο
θα μ’ ευγνωμονείς
για την στα τέσσερα προσγείωσή σου

Πούλησέ μου την ψυχή σου.
Δεν υπάρχει άλλος αγοραστής.

THE PROFESSOR WALKS AGAIN

The professor has already died three times.
After the first death he was told to move his head.
After the second death he was told to sit up.
After the third he was even stood on his feet,
propped up by a stout and robust nanny:
let’s go for a nice walk now.

the brain has been badly damaged in an accident
look, it’s just a miracle the problems he’s overcome:
left right, light dark, tree grass, hurts eat.

Two plus two, professor?
Two, says the professor.
This time the answer’s better than before.

Hurts, grass, sit, bench.
And at the end of the path, once again, old as time,
cheerless, pallid,
thrice banished
the nanny they say is the real one.

The professor is just dying to be with her.
Once again he pulls away from us.

Ο ΚΑΘΗΓΗΤΗΣ ΠΕΡΠΑΤΕΙ ΞΑΝΑ

Ο καθηγητής έχει πεθάνει τρεις φορές κιόλας.
Μετά τον πρώτο θάνατο του είπαν να κουνήσει το κεφάλι του.
Μετά τη δεύτερο θάνατο του είπαν να ανακάτσει.
Μετά την τρίτη φορά σηκωνόταν όρθιος
με τη βοήθεια της σθεναρής κι εποίμονης νοσοκόμας:
ας πάμε για ένα ωραίο περίπατο τώρα.

Ο εγκέφαλος είχε τραυματιστεί άσχημα απ’ το ατύχημα
κοίταξε, είναι θαύμα που ξεπέρασε όλες τις δυσκολίες:
αριστερό – δεξί, φως – σκοτάδι, δέντρο – γρασίδι, πονάει – τρώγε.

Δύο και δύο πόσα κάνουν, κύριε καθηγητά;
Δύο, απαντά εκείνος.
Αυτή τη φορά η απάντηση είναι καλύτερη από πριν.

Πονάει, γρασίδι, κάθησε, παγκάκι.
Και στο τέλος του μονοπατιού, ξανά, γέρος σαν τον χρόνο
αγέλαστος, κατάχλωμος
τρεις φορές τιμωρημένος
η νοσοκόμα αυτή είναι, λένε, είναι η καλύτερη.

Ο καθηγητής πεθαίνει να ` ναι μαζί της.
Για μια φορά ακόμα φεύγει μακριά μας.
RETURNS

He came home. Said nothing.
Through it was clear something unpleasant had happened.
Put his head under the blanket.
Drew up his knees.
He’s about forty, but not at this moment.
He exists—but only as in his mother’s belly
seven layers deep, in protective darkness.
Tomorrow he will give a lecture on homeostasis
in megagalactic cosmonautics.
For now he’s curled up, fallen asleep.

ΓΥΡΙΣΜΟΣ

Γύρισε στο σπίτι. Δεν είπε λέξη.
Παρ’ όλο που ήταν φανερό
ότι κάτι άσχημο είχε συμβεί.
Έχωσε το κεφάλι του κάτω απ’ την κουβέρτα.
Δίπλωσε τα πόδια του.
Είναι γύρω στα σαράντα αλλά όχι αυτή τη στιγμή.
Υπάρχει μόνο στης μάνας του την κοιλιά
μέσα σε επτά στρώματα προστατευτικό σκότος.
Αύριο θα δώσει μία διάλεξη για την ομοιοστατική
σε γιγάντιους γαλαξίες και κοσμοναυτική.
Για την ώρα έχει κουρνιάσει, και κοιμάται.

Maria Wisława Anna Szymborska (2 July 1923 – 1 February 2012) was a Polish poet, essayist, translator and recipient of the 1996 Nobel Prize in Literature. Born in Prowent, which has since become part of Kórnik, she later resided in Kraków until the end of her life. She is described as a “Mozart of Poetry”. In Poland, Szymborska’s books have reached sales rivaling prominent prose authors: although she once remarked in a poem, “Some Like Poetry” (“Niektórzy lubią poezję”), that no more than two out of a thousand people care for the art.
Szymborska was awarded the 1996 Nobel Prize in Literature “for poetry that with ironic precision allows the historical and biological context to come to light in fragments of human reality”. She became better known internationally as a result of this. Her work has been translated into English and many European languages, as well as into Arabic, Hebrew, Japanese and Chinese.
Wisława Szymborska was born on 2 July 1923 in Prowent, Poland (now part of Kórnik, Poland), the daughter of Wincenty and Anna (née Rottermund) Szymborski. Her father was at that time the steward of Count Władysław Zamoyski, a Polish patriot and charitable patron. After the death of Count Zamoyski in 1924, her family moved to Toruń, and in 1931 to Kraków, where she lived and worked until her death in early 2012
When World War II broke out in 1939, she continued her education in underground classes. From 1943, she worked as a railroad employee and managed to avoid being deported to Germany as a forced labourer. It was during this time that her career as an artist began with illustrations for an English-language textbook. She also began writing stories and occasional poems. Beginning in 1945, she began studying Polish literature before switching to sociology at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków. There she soon became involved in the local writing scene, and met and was influenced by Czesław Miłosz. In March 1945, she published her first poem “Szukam słowa” (“Looking for words”) in the daily newspaper, Dziennik Polski. Her poems continued to be published in various newspapers and periodicals for a number of years. In 1948, she quit her studies without a degree, due to her poor financial circumstances; the same year, she married poet Adam Włodek, whom she divorced in 1954 (they remained close until Włodek’s death in 1986). Their union was childless. Around the time of her marriage she was working as a secretary for an educational biweekly magazine as well as an illustrator. Her first book was to be published in 1949, but did not pass censorship as it “did not meet socialist requirements”. Like many other intellectuals in post-war Poland, however, Szymborska adhered to the People’s Republic of Poland’s (PRL) official ideology early in her career, signing an infamous political petition from 8 February 1953, condemning Polish priests accused of treason in a show trial.[9][10][11] Her early work supported socialist themes, as seen in her debut collection Dlatego żyjemy (That is what we are living for), containing the poems “Lenin” and “Młodzieży budującej Nową Hutę” (“For the Youth who are building Nowa Huta”), about the construction of a Stalinist industrial town near Kraków. She became a member of the ruling Polish United Workers’ Party.
Like many communist intellectuals initially close to the official party line, Szymborska gradually grew estranged from socialist ideology and renounced her earlier political work. Although she did not officially leave the party until 1966, she began to establish contacts with dissidents. As early as 1957, she befriended Jerzy Giedroyc, the editor of the influential Paris-based emigré journal Kultura, to which she also contributed. In 1964, she opposed a Communist-backed protest to The Times against independent intellectuals, demanding freedom of speech instead.[12]
In 1953, Szymborska joined the staff of the literary review magazine Życie Literackie (Literary Life), where she continued to work until 1981 and from 1968 ran her own book review column, called Lektury Nadobowiązkowe. Many of her essays from this period were later published in book form. From 1981–83, she was an editor of the Kraków-based monthly periodical, NaGlos (OutLoud). In the 1980s, she intensified her oppositional activities, contributing to the samizdat periodical Arka under the pseudonym “Stańczykówna”, as well as to the Paris-based Kultura. The final collection published while Szymborska was still alive, Dwukropek, was chosen as the best book of 2006 by readers of Poland’s Gazeta Wyborcza.[4] She also translated French literature into Polish, in particular Baroque poetry and the works of Agrippa d’Aubigné. In Germany, Szymborska was associated with her translator Karl Dedecius, who did much to popularize her works there.
~WIKIPEDIA

Βισλάβα Συμπόρσκα–Βιογραφία

Η Βισουάβα Σιμπόρσκα (Wislawa Szymborska) γεννήθηκε το 1923 στο Κούρνικ της Πολωνίας (περιοχή της επαρχίας Πόζναν) κι από εκεί μετακινήθηκε στα οκτώ της χρόνια στην Κρακοβία, τόπο μόνιμης διαμονής της έκτοτε, ως το θάνατό της, την 1η Φεβρουαρίου του 2012, σε ηλικία 88 ετών. Σπούδασε φιλολογία και κοινωνιολογία στο φημισμένο πανεπιστήμιο της πόλης και εμφανίστηκε για πρώτη φορά στην ποίηση το 1945. Μέχρι το 1996, που της απονεμήθηκε το βραβείο Νόμπελ Λογοτεχνίας, είχε εκδώσει μόλις εννέα ποιητικές συλλογές και τέσσερα βιβλία με δοκίμια, ενώ μετέφρασε έμμετρη γαλλική ποίηση και για ένα διάστημα (1967-1972) σχολίαζε τακτικά άσημους μάλλον ξένους και Πολωνούς λογοτέχνες. Τιμήθηκε με το Φιλολογικό Βραβείο της Κρακοβίας (1995), το Πολωνικό Κρατικό Βραβείο για την Τέχνη (1963), το Βραβείο Γκαίτε (1991) και το Βραβείο Χέρντερ (1995) και υπήρξε διδάκτορας της Τέχνης, τιμής ένεκεν, στο Πανεπιστήμιο του Πόζναν. Ανήκει μαζί με τους Ζμπίγκνιεβ Χέρμπερτ και Ταντέους Ρουζέβιτς στην κορυφή της πυραμίδας των μεταπολεμικών εκπροσώπων της λεγόμενης “Πολωνικής σχολής της ποίησης”, παρότι η αναγνώρισή της στην Ευρώπη, και ιδιαίτερα στον αγγλοσαξονικό χώρο έγινε πολύ αργότερα απ’ αυτούς.

Η Σιμπόρσκα από νωρίς διαγράφει το ποιητικό της κλίμα, γράφοντας ότι “δανείζεται λέξεις που βαραίνουν από πάθος και μετά προσπαθεί να τις κάνει να δείχνουν ελαφρές”. Η κλασικότροπη κομψότητα στον χειρισμό και την ανάπτυξη του ποιητικού της υλικού συνδυάζεται με μιαν ανάλαφρη προσέγγιση των πραγμάτων και έναν απατηλά εύθυμο σκεπτικισμό, όπου υφέρπει η επώδυνη συνείδηση της ανθρώπινης συνθήκης και περιπέτειας στον κόσμο, αλλά και η ζωντανή, εις πείσμα της θνητής μας μοίρας και της ιστορίας (όπου επαναλαμβάνεται συνήθως η τραγωδία), ελπίδα. Γιατί, για τη Σιμπόρσκα, ο κόσμος, παρά την ανασφάλεια, τον φόβο και το μίσος που εκτρέφει και καλλιεργεί η ανθρώπινη φύση μας, δεν παύει να προκαλεί και να εκπλήσσει, κι η φύση μαζί με την τέχνη παραμένουν πάντοτε οι καλύτεροι μεσίτες γι’ αυτό το όραμα (όπως κατέληξε στην εκδήλωση για την απονομή του Νόμπελ: “Οι ποιητές, φαίνεται, θα έχουν πάντοτε πολλή δουλειά”).

Κάποια από τα ποιήματα της Σιμπόρσκα, γραμμένα σε ανύποπτο χρόνο, αποκτούν μια δραματική επικαιρότητα σήμερα που ολόκληρη η ανθρωπότητα βιώνει το άγχος της τρομοκρατίας με μοναδική ένταση, και είναι δείγματα της βαθιάς ηθικής συνείδησης και εγρήγορσης που διατρέχει τελικά όλο το ποιητικό της έργο.

~Translation from the English into Greek by Manolis Aligizakis

Advertisements

ΚΩΣΤΗΣ ΠΑΛΑΜΑΣ/KOSTIS PALAMAS

Eθνικός Ποιητής της Ελλάδας/National Poet of Greece

Ο Κωστής Παλαμάς ήταν ποιητής, πεζογράφος, θεατρικός συγγραφέας, ιστορικός και κριτικός της λογοτεχνίας. Θεωρείται ένας από τους σημαντικότερους Έλληνες ποιητές, με σημαντική συνεισφορά στην εξέλιξη και ανανέωση της νεοελληνικής ποίησης. Αποτέλεσε κεντρική μορφή της λογοτεχνικής γενιάς του 1880, πρωτοπόρος, μαζί με το Νίκο Καμπά και το Γεώργιο Δροσίνη, της αποκαλούμενης Νέας Αθηναϊκής Σχολής. Επίσης, είχε σπουδάσει και ως θεατρικός παραγωγός της ελληνικής λογοτεχνίας.

Γεννήθηκε στην Πάτρα στις 13 Ιανουαρίου1859 από γονείς που κατάγονταν από το Μεσολόγγι. Η οικογένεια του πατέρα του ήταν οικογένεια λογίων, με αξιόλογη πνευματική δραστηριότητα, και ασχολούμενων με τη θρησκεία. Ο προπάππος του Παναγιώτης Παλαμάς (1722-1803) είχε ιδρύσει στο Μεσολόγγι την περίφημη “Παλαμαία Σχολή” και ο παππούς του Ιωάννης είχε διδάξει στην Πατριαρχική Ακαδημία της Κωνσταντινούπολης. Ο θείος του Ανδρέας Παλαμάς υπήρξε πρωτοψάλτης και υμνογράφος, τον οποίο ο Κωστής Παλαμάς αναφέρει στα “Διηγήματά” του (Β’ έκδοση, 1929, σελ. 200). Ο Μιχαήλ Ευσταθίου Παλαμάς (αδελφός του Ανδρέα) και ο Πανάρετος Παλαμάς ήταν ασκητές. Ο Δημήτριος Ι. Παλαμάς, επίσης θείος του Κωστή, ήταν ψάλτης και υμνογράφος στο Μεσολόγγι.

Μετά την αποφοίτησή του από το γυμνάσιο εγκαταστάθηκε στην Αθήνα το 1875, όπου γράφτηκε στην Νομική Σχολή. Σύντομα όμως εγκατέλειψε τις σπουδές του αποφασισμένος να ασχοληθεί με τη λογοτεχνία. Από το 1875 δημοσίευε σε εφημερίδες και περιοδικά διάφορα ποιήματα και το 1876 υπέβαλε στον Βουτσιναίο ποιητικό διαγωνισμό την ποιητική συλλογή Ερώτων Έπη, σε καθαρεύουσα. Από το 1898 εκείνος και οι δύο φίλοι και συμφοιτητές του Νίκος Καμπάς και Γεώργιος Δροσίνης άρχισαν να συνεργάζονται με τις πολιτικές-σατιρικές εφημερίδες “Ραμπαγάς” και “Μη χάνεσαι”. Οι τρεις φίλοι είχαν συνειδητοποιήσει την παρακμή του αθηναϊκού ρομαντισμού και με το έργο τους παρουσίαζαν μια νέα ποιητική πρόταση, η οποία βέβαια ενόχλησε τους παλαιότερους ποιητές, που τους αποκαλούσαν περιφρονητικά “παιδαρέλια” ή ποιητές της “Νέας Σχολής”.

Το 1886 δημοσιεύτηκε η πρώτη του ποιητική συλλογή Τραγούδια της Πατρίδος μου στη δημοτική γλώσσα, η οποία εναρμονίζεται απόλυτα με το κλίμα της Νέας Αθηναϊκής Σχολής. Το 1887 παντρεύτηκε τη συμπατριώτισσά του Μαρία Βάλβη, με την οποία απέκτησαν τρία παιδιά, μεταξύ των οποίων και ο Λέανδρος Παλαμάς. Το 1889 δημοσιεύτηκε ο Ύμνος εις την Αθηνάν, αφιερωμένος στη γυναίκα του, για τον οποίο βραβεύτηκε στον Φιλαδέλφειο ποιητικό διαγωνισμό την ίδια χρονιά. Ένδειξη της καθιέρωσής του ως ποιητή ήταν η ανάθεση της σύνθεσης του Ύμνου των Ολυμπιακών Αγώνων, το 1896. Το 1898, μετά το θάνατο του γιου του Άλκη σε ηλικία τεσσάρων ετών, δημοσίευσε την ποιητική σύνθεση “Ο Τάφος”. Το 1897 διορίστηκε γραμματέας στο Πανεπιστήμιο Αθηνών, απ’ όπου αποχώρησε το 1928. Από την ίδια χρονιά (1897) άρχισε να δημοσιεύει τις σημαντικότερες ποιητικές του συλλογές και συνθέσεις, όπως οι “Ίαμβοι και Ανάπαιστοι” (1897), “Ασάλευτη Ζωή” (1904), “ο Δωδεκάλογος του Γύφτου” (1907), “Η Φλογέρα του Βασιλιά” (1910). Το 1918 του απονεμήθηκε το Εθνικό Αριστείο Γραμμάτων και Τεχνών, ενώ από το 1926 αποτέλεσε βασικό μέλος της Ακαδημίας των Αθηνών, της οποίας έγινε πρόεδρος το 1930.

Κατά τον Ελληνοϊταλικό πόλεμο του 1940 ο Κωστής Παλαμάς μαζί με άλλους Έλληνες λογίους προσυπέγραψε την έκκληση των Ελλήνων Διανοουμένων προς τους διανοούμενους ολόκληρου του κόσμου, με την οποία αφενός μεν καυτηριάζονταν η κακόβουλη ιταλική επίθεση, αφετέρου δε, διέγειρε την παγκόσμια κοινή γνώμη σε επανάσταση συνειδήσεων για κοινό νέο πνευματικό Μαραθώνα.

Πέθανε στις 27 Φεβρουαρίου του 1943 έπειτα από σοβαρή ασθένεια, 40 ημέρες μετά το θάνατο της συζύγου του (τον οποίο δεν είχε πληροφορηθεί επειδή και η δική του υγεία ήταν σε κρίσιμη κατάσταση). Η κηδεία του έμεινε ιστορική, καθώς μπροστά σε έκπληκτους Γερμανούς κατακτητές και χιλιάδες κόσμου τον συνόδευσε στην τελευταία του κατοικία, στο Α΄ νεκροταφείο Αθηνών, ψάλλοντας τον εθνικό ύμνο.

Η οικία του Παλαμά στην Πάτρα σώζεται ως σήμερα στην οδό Κορίνθου 241. Τρία χρόνια πριν τη γέννηση του Παλαμά στο ίδιο σπίτι γεννήθηκε η μεγάλη Ιταλίδα πεζογράφος Ματθίλδη Σεράο.

KOSTIS PALAMAS

Kostis Palamas (Greek: ΚωστήςΠαλαμάς; 13 January 1859 – 27 February 1943) was a Greek poet who wrote the words to the Olympic Hymn. He was a central figure of the Greek literary generation of the 1880s and one of the cofounders of the so-called New Athenian School along with Georgios Drosinis, Nikos Kampas, Ioanis Polemis.

Born in Patras, he received his primary and secondary education in Mesolonghi. In 1880s, he worked as a journalist. He published his first collection of verses, the “Songs of My Fatherland“, in 1886. He held an administrative post at the University of Athens between 1897 and 1926, and died during the German occupation of Greece during World War II. His funeral was a major event of the Greek resistance: the funerary poem composed and recited by fellow poet Angelos Sikelianos roused the mourners and culminated in an angry demonstration of a 100,000 people against Nazi occupation.

Palamas wrote the lyrics to the Olympic Hymn, composed by Spyridon Samaras. It was first performed at the 1896 Summer Olympics, the first modern Olympic Games. The Hymn was then shelved as each host city from then until the 1960 Winter Olympics commissioned an original piece for its edition of the Games, but the version by Samaras and Palamas was declared the official Olympic Anthem in 1958 and has been performed at each edition of the Games since the 1960 Winter Olympics.

The old administration building of the University of Athens, in downtown Athens, where his work office was located, is now dedicated to him as the “Kosti Palamas Building” and houses the “Greek Theater Museum“, as well as many temporary exhibitions.

He has been informally called the “national” poet of Greece and was closely associated with the struggle to rid Modern Greece of the “purist” language and with political liberalism. He dominated literary life for 30 or more years and greatly influenced the entire political-intellectual climate of his time. Romain Rolland considered him the greatest poet of Europe and he was twice nominated for the Nobel Prize for Literature but never received it. His most important poem,[2]The Twelve Lays of the Gypsy” (1907), is a poetical and philosophical journey. His “Gypsy” is a free-thinking, intellectual rebel, a Greek Gypsy in a post-classical, post-Byzantine Greek world, an explorer of work, love, art, country, history, religion and science, keenly aware of his roots and of the contradictions between his classical and Christian heritages.

“RUINS” from the book “Still Life”
Translated by Alex Moskios

I returned to my golden playgrounds,
I returned to my white boyhood trail,
I returned to see the wondrous palace,
Built just for me by love’s divine ways.
Blackberry bushes now cover the boyhood trail,
And the midday suns have burned the playgrounds,
And a tremor has destroyed my palace so rare,
And in the midst of fallen walls and burned Timbers,
I remain lifeless; lizards and snakes
With me now live the sorrows and the hates;
And of my palace a broken mass now remains.

“GRIEF” from the book “Heartaches of the Lagoon”
Translated by Alex Moskios

My early unforgettable years I lived them
close to the sea,
there by the shallow and calm sea,
there by the open and boundless sea.

And every time that my budding, early life
comes back to me,
and I see the dreams and hear the voices
of my early life there by the sea,

you, oh my heart, feel the same old yearning:
if I could live again,
close to the shallow and calm sea,
there by the open and boundless sea.

Was it really my destiny, was it my fortune,
I haven’t met another
a sea within me as shallow as a lake,
and like an ocean boundless and big.

And, lo! In my sleep a dream brought her
close again to me,
the same there shallow and calm sea,
the same there boundless and open sea.

Yet, thrice be alas! A grief was poisoning me,
a powerful grief,
a grief that you did not lighten, my dream
of my great early love, my home by the sea.

What storm, I wonder, was raging in me,
and what whirlwind,
that couldn’t put it to rest, or lull it to sleep
my wonderful dream of my home by the sea.

A grief that is unspoken, an unexplained grief,
a powerful grief,
a grief not quenched even within the paradise
of our early life close to the boundless sea.