Posts Tagged ‘Cavafy’

cavafy copy
SCULPTOR OF TYANA

As you may have heard, I am not a beginner.
Some good quantity of stone goes through my hands
and in my home country, Tyana, they know me
well; and here the senators have ordered
a number of statues from me.

Let me show you
some right now. Have a good look at this Rhea;
venerable, full of forbearance, really ancient.
Look closely at Pompey. Marius,
Aemilius Paulus, the African Scipio.
True resemblances, as true as I could make them.
Patroklos (I’ll have to touch him up a bit).
Close to those pieces
of yellowish marble over there, is Caesarion.

And for a while now I have been busy
creating a Poseidon. I carefully study
his horses in particular, how to shape them.
They have to be so light that their bodies,
their legs show that they don’t touch
the earth but run over water.

But here is my most beloved creation
that I worked with such feeling and great care
on a warm summer day
when my mind ascended to the ideals
I had a dream of him, this young Hermes.

~ Constantine Cavafy, translated by Manolis Aligizakis, Libros Libertad, 2011

ΤΥΑΝΕΥΣ ΓΛΥΠΤΗΣ

Καθώς που θα το ακούσατε, δεν είμ’ αρχάριος.
Κάμποση πέτρα από τα χέρια μου περνά.
Και στην πατρίδα μου, τα Τύανα, καλά
με ξέρουνε, κ’ εδώ αγάλματα πολλά
με παραγγείλανε συγκλητικοί.
Και να σας δείξω
αμέσως μερικά. Παρατηρείστ’ αυτήν την Ρέα
σεβάσμια, γεμάτη καρτερία, παναρχαία.
Παρατηρείστε τον Πομπήιον. Ο Μάριος,
ο Αιμίλιος Παύλος, ο Αφρικανός Σκιπίων.
Ομοιώματα, όσο που μπόρεσα, πιστά.
Ο Πάτροκλος (ολίγο θα τον ξαναγγίξω).
Πλησίον στου μαρμάρου, του κιτρινωπού
εκείνα τα κομμάτια, είν’ ο Καισαρίων.

Και τώρα καταγίνομαι από καιρό αρκετό
να κάμω έναν Ποσειδώνα. Μελετώ
κυρίως για τ’ άλογά του, πώς να πλάσσω αυτά.
Πρέπει ελαφρά έτσι να γίνουν που
τα σώματα, τα πόδια των να δείχνυον φανερά
που δεν πατούν την γη, μον τρέχουν στα νερά.

Μα να το έργον μου το πιο αγαπητό
που δούλεψα συγκινημένα και το πιο προσεκτικά
αυτόν, μια μέρα του καλοκαιριού θερμή
που ο νους μου ανέβαινε στα ιδανικά,
αυτόν εδώ ονειρευόμουν τον νέον Ερμή.

~ Constantine Cavafy, translated by Manolis Aligizakis, Libros Libertad, 2011

!cid_73928743-773D-47E5-B066-8F82C0F99FC6@local

THE SATRAPY

How unfortunate though you are made
for great and beautiful deeds
your unjust fate always denies you
encouragement and success;
worthless habits, pettiness
and indifference distract you.
And what a horrible day when you give in
(the day you let yourself give in)
and you set out on the road to Susa
and you approach the monarch Artaxerxes
who favors you with a place at his court
and offers you satrapies and such.
And you accept them in despair
these things that you don’t want.
Your soul craves other things, yearns for other things:
the praise of the people and the sophists,
that difficult and priceless “Well Done”;
the Agora, the Theater, and the Laurels.
Will Artaxerxes give you these things?
Can your Satrapy provide them?
And what sort of life will you live without them?

Η ΣΑΤΡΑΠΕΙΑ

Τί συμφορά, ενώ είσαι καμωμένος
για τα ωραία και μεγάλα έργα
η άδικη αυτή σου η τύχη πάντα
ενθάρρυνσι κ επιτυχία να σε αρνείται
να σ’ εμποδίζουν ευτελείς συνήθειες
και μικροπρέπειες, κι αδιαφορίες.
Και τί φρικτή η μέρα που ενδίδεις
(η μέρα που αφέθηκες κ’ ενδίδεις)
και φεύγεις οδοιπόρος για τα Σούσα,
και πιαίνεις στον μονάρχη Αρταξέρξη
που ευνοϊκά σε βάζει στην αυλή του,
και σε προσφέρει σατραπείες και τέτοια.
Και συ τα δέχεσαι με απελπισία
αυτά τα πράγματα που δεν τα θέλεις.
Άλλα ζητεί η ψυχή σου, γι’ άλλα κλαίει
τον έπαινο του Δήμου και των Σοφιστών
τα δύσκολα και τ’ ανεκτίμητα Εύγε
την Αγορά, το Θέατρο, και τους Στεφάνους.
Αυτά που θα στα δώσει ο Αρταξέρξης,
αυτά που θα τα βρεις στη σατραπεία
και τί ζωή χωρίς αυτά θα κάμεις.

~Κωνσταντίνου Καβάφη-Ποιήματα/Μετάφραση Μανώλη Αλυγιζάκη
~C. P. Cavafy-Poems/translated by Manolis Aligizakis

cavafy copy

THE HORSES OF ACHILLES

When they saw Patroklos dead
who was so brave and strong and young
the horses of Achilles began to cry;
their immortal nature was outraged
at the sight of this work of death.
They reared up and tossed their long manes
they stamped the ground with their hooves and mourned
Patroklos whom they felt was soulless — devastated —
lifeless flesh now — his spirit gone —
defenseless — without breath —
returned from life to the great Nothing.

Zeus saw the tears of the immortal
horses and felt sad. He said, “At the wedding of Peleus
I shouldn’t have acted so mindlessly;
it would have been better if we had not given you away
my unhappy horses! What need did you have to be
down there among miserable humans, playthings of fate.
You whom death cannot ambush, you who will never grow old
you are still tormented by disaster. People
have entangled you in their suffering.” — But
for the endless calamity of death
those two noble animals shed their tears.

ΤΑ ΑΛΟΓΑ ΤΟΥ ΑΧΙΛΛΕΩΣ

Τον Πάτροκλο σαν είδαν σκοτωμένο,
που ήταν τόσο ανδρείος, και δυνατός, και νέος
άρχισαν τ’ άλογα να κλαίνε του Αχιλλέως
η φύσις των η αθάνατη αγανακτούσε
για του θανάτου αυτό το έργον που θωρούσε.
Τινάζαν τα κεφάλια των και τες μακρυές χαίτες κουνούσαν
την γη χτυπούσαν με τα πόδια, και θρηνούσαν
τον Πάτροκλο που ενοιώθανε άψυχο — αφανισμένο
μια σάρκα τώρα ποταπή — το πνεύμα του χαμένο
ανυπεράσπιστο — χωρίς πνοή—
εις το μεγάλο Τίποτε επιστραμένο απ’ την ζωή.

Τα δάκρυα είδε ο Ζεύς των αθανάτων
αλόγων και λυπήθη. «Στου Πηλέως τον γάμο»
είπε «δεν έπρεπ’ έτσι άσκεπτα να κάμω
καλύτερα να μην σας δίναμε άλογά μου
δυστυχισμένα! Τί γυρεύατ’ εκει χάμου
σταν άθλια ανθρωπότητα πούναι το παίγνιον της μοίρας.
Σεις που ουδέ ο θάνατος φυλάγει, ουδέ γήρας
πρόσκαιρες συμφορές σας τυραννούν. Στα βάσανά των
σας έμπλεξαν οι ανθρώποι.»—Ώμως τα δάκρυά των
για του θανάτου την παντοτεινή
την συμφορά εχύνανε τα δυο τα ζώα τα ευγενή.

~Constantine Cavafy, Selected Poems, translated by Manolis Aligizakis, Ekstasis Editions, 2013

Manolis Aligizakis, Ekstasis Editions, 2013

cavafy copy

THE CITY

You said: “I’ll go to another land, to another sea;
I’ll find another city better than this one.
Every effort I make is ill-fated, doomed;
and my heart —like a dead thing—lies buried.
How long will my mind continue to wither like this?
Everywhere I turn my eyes, wherever they happen to fall
I see the black ruins of my life, here
where I’ve squandered, wasted and ruined so many years.”
New lands you will not find, you will not find other seas.
The city will follow you. You will return to the same streets.
You will age in the same neighborhoods; and in these
same houses you will turn gray. You will always
arrive in the same city. Don’t even hope to escape it,
there is no ship for you, no road out of town.
As you have wasted your life here, in this small corner
you’ve wasted it in the whole world.

Η ΠΟΛΙΣ

Είπες «Θά πάγω σ’ άλλη γή, θά πάγω σ’ άλλη θάλασσα.
Μιά πόλις άλλη θά βρεθεί καλλίτερη από αυτή.
Κάθε προσπάθεια μου μιά καταδίκη είναι γραφτή
κ’ είν’ η καρδιά μου—σάν νεκρός—θαμένη.
Ο νούς μου ώς πότε μές στόν μαρασμό αυτόν θά μένει.
Όπου τό μάτι μου γυρίσω, όπου κι άν δώ
ερείπια μαύρα τής ζωής μου βλέπω εδώ,
πού τόσα χρόνια πέρασα καί ρήμαξα καί χάλασα.»
Καινούριους τόπους δέν θά βρείς, δέν θάβρεις άλλες θάλασσες.
Η πόλις θά σέ ακολουθεί. Στούς δρόμους θά γυρνάς
τούς ίδιους. Καί στές γειτονιές τές ίδιες θά γερνάς
καί μές στά ίδια σπίτια αυτά θ’ ασπρίζεις.
Πάντα στήν πόλι αυτή θά φθάνεις. Γιά τά αλλού—μήν ελπίζεις—
δέν έχει πλοίο γιά σέ, δέν έχει οδό.
Έτσι πού τή ζωή σου ρήμαξες εδώ
στήν κώχη τούτη τήν μικρή, σ όλην τήν γή τήν χάλασες.

“C. P. Cavafy-Poems”, Libros Libertad, 2008/Translated by Manolis Aligizakis
http://www.libroslibertad.ca

cavafy copy

ΘΕΡΜΟΠΥΛΕΣ

 

Τιμή σ’ εκείνους όπου στήν ζωή των

ώρισαν καί φυλάγουν Θερμοπύλες.

Ποτέ από τό χρέος μή κινούντες

δίκαιοι κ’ ίσιοι σ’ όλες των τές πράξεις,

αλλά μέ λύπη κιόλας κ’ ευσπλαχνία

γενναίοι οσάκις είναι πλούσιοι, κι όταν

είναι πτωχοί, παλ’ εις μικρόν γενναιοι,

πάλι συντρέχοντες όσο μπορούνε

παντοτε τήν αλήθεια ομιλούντες,

πλήν χωρίς μίσος γιά τούς ψευδομένους.

 

Καί περισσότερη τιμή τούς πρέπει

όταν προβλέπουν (καί πολλοί προβλέπουν)

πώς ο Εφιάλτης θά φανεί στό τέλος,

κ’ οι Μήδοι επί τέλους θά διαβούνε.

 

 

THERMOPYLAE

 

Honor to those who in their lives

are committed to guard Thermopylae.

Never swerving from duty;

just and exact in all their actions,

but tolerant too, and compassionate;

generous when rich, and when

they are poor, again a little generous,

again assisting as much as they can;

always speaking the truth,

but without hatred for those who lie.

 

And more honor is due to them

when they foresee (and many do foresee)

that Ephialtes will finally appear

and in the end the Medes will break through.

!cid_73928743-773D-47E5-B066-8F82C0F99FC6@local

ΤΡΩΕΣ

Είν’η προσπάθειές μας, τών συφοριασμένων

είν’ η προσπάθειές μας σάν τών Τρώων.

Κομμάτι κατορθώνουμε  κομμάτι

παίρνουμ’ επάνω μας κι αρχίζουμε

νάχουμε θάρρος καί καλές ελπίδες.

Μα πάντα κάτι βγαίνει καί μάς σταματά.

Ο Αχιλλεύς στήν τάφρον εμπροστά μας

βγαίνει καί μέ φωνές μεγάλες μάς τρομάζει.—

Είν’ η προσπάθειές μας σάν τών Τρώων.

Θαρούμε πώς μέ απόφασι καί τόλμη

θ’ αλλάξουμε τής τύχης τήν καταφορά,

κ’ έξω στεκόμεθα ν’ αγωνισθούμε.

Αλλ’ όταν η μεγάλη κρίσις έλθει,

η τόλμη κ’ η απόφασίς μας χάνονται

ταράττεται η ψυχή μας, παραλύει

κι ολόγυρα απ’ τα τείχη τρέχουμε

ζητώντας νά γλυτώσουμε μέ τήν φυγή.

Όμως η πτώσις μας είναι βεβαία. Επάνω,

στά τείχη, άρχισεν ήδη ο θρήνος.

Τών ημερών μας αναμνήσεις κλαίν κ’ αισθήματα.

Πικρά γιά μάς ο Πρίαμος κ’ η Εκάβη κλαίνε.

 

TROJANS

 

Our efforts are those of the unfortunate

like the efforts of the Trojans.

We succeed a bit; we regain

our confidence a bit; and we start again

to feel brave to have high hopes.

But something always comes up to stop us.

Achilles appears before us in the trench

and with his loud shouting frightens us.—

Our efforts are like those of the Trojans.

We think that with resolution and boldness

we can reverse the downhill course of fate

and we stand outside ready to fight.

But when the great crisis comes

our boldness and resolution vanish;

our soul is shaken, paralyzed;

and we run around the walls

trying to save ourselves by running away.

And yet our fall is certain. High up,

on the walls, the dirge has already started.

Memories and emotions of our days mourn.

Priamos and Ekavi weep bitterly for us.

Κ.Π. Καβάφη “Τρώες”, μετάφραση Μανώλη Αλυγιζάκη

C.P. Cavafy “The Trojans”, translated by Manolis Aligizakis

 

Image

ΜΟΝΟΤΟΝΙΑ

Τήν μιά μονότονην ημέραν άλλη

μονότονη, απαράλλακτη ακολουθεί. Θά γίνουν

τά ίδια πράγματα, θά ξαναγίνουν πάλι—

η όμοιες στιγμές μάς βρίσκουνε καί μάς αφίνουν.

Μήνας περνά καί φέρνει άλλον μήνα.

Αυτά πού έρχονται κανείς εύκολα τά εικάζει

είναι τά χθεσινά τά βαρετά εκείνα.

Καί καταντά το αύριο πιά σάν αύριο νά μή μοιάζει.

 

 

 

MONOTONY

One monotonous day is followed by

another identical monotonous day.

The same things will happen, they

will happen again—

the same moments will find us and leave us.

A month goes by and brings another month.

It’s easy to see what’s coming next;

those boring things from the day before.

Till tomorrow doesn’t feel like tomorrow at all.

ΑΠ ΤΕΣ ΕΝΝΙΑ—

 

 

Δώδεκα καί μισή. Γρήγορα πέρασεν η ώρα

απ’ τές εννιά πού άναψα τήν λάμπα

καί κάθισα εδώ. Κάθουμουν χωρίς νά διαβάζω

καί χωρίς νά μιλώ. Μέ ποιόνα νά μιλήσω

κατάμονος μέσα στό σπίτι αυτό.

Τό είδωλον τού νέου σώματος μου

απ’τές εννιά πού άναψα τήν λάμπα

ήλθε καί μέ ηύρε καί μέ θύμισε

κλειστές κάμαρες αρωματισμένες,

καί περασμένην ηδονή—τί τολμηρή ηδονή!

Κ’ επίσης μ’ έφερε στά μάτια εμπρός,

δρόμους πού τώρα έγιναν αγνώριστοι,

κέντρα γεμάτα κίνησι πού τέλεψαν,

καί θέατρα καί καφενεία πού ήσαν μιά φορά.

Το είδωλον τού νέου σώματός μου

ήλθε καί μ’ έφερε καί τά λυπητρεά

πένθη τής οικογένειας, χωρισμοί

αισθήματα δικών μου, αισθήματα

τών πεθαμένων τόσο λίγο εκτιμηθέντα.

Δώδεκα καί μισή. Πώς πέρασεν η ώρα.

Δώδεκα καί μισή. Πώς πέρασαν τά χρόνια.

 

SINCE NINE O’CLOCK

 

 

Twelve-thirty. Time has gone by quickly

since nine o’clock when I lit the lamp

and sat down here. I sat without reading,

and without speaking. Whom would I speak to

alone in this house?

The vision of my youthful body

has come and visited me since nine o’clock

when I lit the lamp and has recalled

closed rooms full of fragrance

and lost carnal pleasure—what bold pleasure!

And it also brought before my eyes,

roads that are now unrecognizable,

taverns full of action that have closed,

and theaters and coffee bars that no longer exist.

The vision of my youthful body

also brought me sad memories;

family mourning, separations,

feelings about loved ones, emotions

of the dead so little appreciated.

Half past twelve. How time has gone by.

Half past twelve. How the years went by.

Sensuous, erotic, exact Cavafy does not so much tell a story as create an atmosphere, sweeping the reader away on a blue Aegean sea of longing.

The endurance of his work is in his approach, embodying both the immediacy of

the Hellenic past and the direct moment of an imagined erotic encounter.

 

ΣΤΟΥ ΚΑΦΕΝΕΙΟΥ ΤΗΝ ΕΙΣΟΔΟ

 

Τήν προσοχή μου κάτι πού είπαν πλάγι μου

διεύθυνε στού καφενείου τήν είσοδο.

Κ’ είδα τ’ ωραίο σώμα πού έμοιαζε

σάν απ’ τήν άκρα πείρα του νά τώκαμεν ο Έρως—

πλάττοντας τά συμμετρικά του μέλη μέ χαρά

υψώνοντας γλυπτό τό ανάστημα

πλάττοντας μέ συγκίνησι τό πρόσωπο

κι αφίνοντας απ’ τών χεριών τό άγγιγμα

ένα αίσθημα στό μέτωπο, στά μάτια, καί στά χείλη.

 

 

AT THE ENTRANCE OF THE CAFE

 

Something they said at the next table

directed my attention to the café door.

And I saw the beautiful body that looked

like Eros had made it out of his most exquisite experience—

shaping its symmetrical limbs joyfully;

raising its sculptured stature;

transforming the face with emotion

and leaving with the tips of his fingers

a distant nuance on the brow, on the eyes, and on the lips.

 

 

ΜΙΑ ΝΥΧΤΑ

 

Η κάμαρα ήταν πτωχική καί πρόστυχη

κρυμένη επάνω από τήν ύποπτη ταβέρνα.

Απ’ τό παράθυρο φαίνονταν τό σοκάκι

τό ακάθαρτο καί τό στενό. Από κάτω

ήρχονταν η φωνές κάτι εργατών

πού έπαιζαν χαρτιά καί πού γλεντούσαν.

 

Κ’ εκεί στό λαϊκό, τό ταπεινό κρεββάτι

είχα τό σώμα τού έρωτος, είχα τά χείλη

τά ηδονικά καί ρόδινα τής μέθης—

τά ρόδινα μιάς τέτοιας μέθης, πού καί τώρα

πού γράφω, έπειτ’ από τόσα χρόνια,

μές στό μονήρες σπίτι μου, μεθώ ξανά.

 

ONE NIGHT

 

The room was poor and cheap

hidden above the shady tavern.

From the window the street was visible,

narrow and filthy. From below

came the voices of some workers

who played cards and joked around.

 

And there on the much used, lowly bed

I had the body of Eros, I had the lips,

the lustful and rosy lips of euphoria—

the rosy lips of such euphoria, that even now

as I write, after all these years,

in my solitary house, I get intoxicated again.

 

ΕΠΕΣΤΡΕΦΕ

 

 

Επέστρεφε συχνά καί παίρνε με,

αγαπημένη αίσθησις επέτρεφε καί παίρνε με—

όταν ξυπνά τού σώματος η μνήμη,

κ’ επιθυμία παληά ξαναπερνά στό αίμα

όταν τά χείλη καί τό δέρμα ενθυμούνται,

κ’ αισθάνονται τά χέρια σάν ν’ αγγίζουν πάλι.

 

Επέστρεφε συχνά καί παίρνε με τήν νύχτα,

όταν τά χείλη καί τό δέρμα ενθυμούνται…

 

COME BACK

 

Come back often and take me,

beloved sensation, come back and take me—

when the memory in my body awakens,

and the old desire again runs through my blood;

when the lips and the skin remember

and the hands feel as if they were touching again.

 

Come back often and take me at night,

when the lips and the skin remember…

 

ΜΑΚΡΥΑ

 

Θάθελα αυτήν τήν μνήμη νά τήν πω…

Μά έτσι εσβύσθη πιά…σάν τίποτε δέν απομένει—

γιατί μακρυά στά πρώτα εφηβικά μου χρόνια κείται.

 

Δέρμα σάν καμωμένο από ιασεμί…

Εκείνη τού Αυγούστου—Αύγουστος ήταν; —η βραδυά…

Μόλις θυμούμαι πιά τά μάτια ήσαν, θαρρώ, μαβιά…

Α, ναί, μαβιά, ένα σαπφείρικο μαβί.

 

FAR AWAY

 

I would like to tell you a memory…

But it seems nearly erased…and as though nothing remains—

because it lies far away in my youthful years.

 

Skin like it was made of jasmine…

That day in August—was it August?—the night…

I barely remember the eyes; they were, I think, blue…

Ah yes, blue; a sapphire blue.

 

ΟΜΝΥΕΙ

 

Ομνύει κάθε τόσο   ν’ αρχίσει πιό καλή ζωή.

Αλλ’ όταν έλθει η νύχτα    μέ τές δικές της συμβουλές,

μέ τούς συμβιβασμούς της    καί μέ τές υποσχέσεις της

αλλ’ όταν έλθει η νύχτα    μέ τήν δική της δύναμι

τού σώματος πού θέλει καί ζητεί, στήν ίδια

μοιραία χαρά, χαμένος, ξαναπιαίνει.

 

HESWEARS

 

Quite often he swears   to start a better life.

But when the night comes   with its own advisories,

with its compromises,   and with its promises;

when the night comes   with its own power

over the body that craves and seeks,

to the same dark joy, forlorn, he returns.

 

ΕΠΗΓΑ

 

Δέν εδεσμεύθηκα. Τελείως αφέθηκα κ’ επήγα.

Στές απολαύσεις, πού μισό πραγματικές

μισό γυρνάμενες μές στό μυαλό μου ήσαν,

επήγα μές στήν φωτισμένη νύχτα.

Κ’ ήπια από δυνατά κρασιά, καθώς

πού πίνουν οι ανδρείοι τής ηδονής.

 

I WENT

 

I did not restrain myself.

I set myself entirely free and I went.

To the pleasures that were half real,

half turning around inside my mind,

I went to the illuminated night.

And I drank strong wines, like the ones

those who are unafraid of carnal delights drink.

 

 

English translation by Manolis Aligizakis

www.libroslibertad.ca

www.ekstasiseditions.com

 ΤΑ ΑΛΟΓΑ ΤΟΥ ΑΧΙΛΛΕΩΣ

         Τόν Πάτροκλο σάν είδαν σκοτωμένο,

    πού ήταν τόσο ανδρείος, καί δυνατός, καί νέος

    άρχισαν τ’ άλογα νά κλαίνε τού Αχιλλέως

         η φύσις των η αθάνατη αγανακτούσε

γιά τού θανάτου αυτό τό έργον πού θωρούσε.

Τινάζαν τά κεφάλια των καί τές μακρυές χαίτες κουνούσαν

    τήν γή χτυπούσαν μέ τά πόδια, καί θρηνούσαν

τόν Πάτροκλο πού ενοιώθανε άψυχο—αφανισμένο—

μιά σάρκα τώρα ποταπή—τό πνεύμα του χαμένο—

         ανυπεράσπιστο—χωρίς πνοή—

εις τό μεγάλο Τίποτε επιστραμένο απ’ τήν ζωή.

         Τά δάκρυα είδε ο Ζεύς τών αθανάτων

    αλόγων καί λυπήθη. «Στού Πηλέως τόν γάμο»

    είπε «δέν έπρεπ’ έτσι άσκεπτα νά κάμω

         καλύτερα νά μήν σάς δίναμε άλογά μου

    δυστυχισμένα! Τι γυρεύατ’ εκεί χάμου

στήν άθλια ανθρωπότητα πούναι τό παίγνιον τής μοίρας.

         Σείς πού ουδέ ο θάνατος φυλάγει, ουδέ γήρας

    πρόσκαιρες συμφορές σάς τυραννούν. Στά βάσανά των

    σάς έμπλεξαν οι ανθρώποι.»—Ώμως τά δάκρυά των

         γιά τού θανάτου τήν παντοτεινή

    τήν συμφορά εχύνανε τά δυό τά ζώα τά ευγενή.

 

THE HORSES OF ACHILLES

              When they saw Patroklos dead,

       who was so brave, and strong, and young,

       the horses of Achilles began to cry;

              their immortal nature was outraged

       at the sight of this work of death.

They reared up, and tossed their long manes,

       they stamped the ground with their hooves, and mourned

Patroklos, whom they felt was soulless—devastated—

lifeless flesh now—his spirit gone—

              defenseless—without breath—

returned from life to the great Nothing.

              Zeus saw the tears of the immortal

       horses and felt sad. He said, “At the wedding of Peleus

I shouldn’t have acted so mindlessly;

              it would have been better if we had not given you away,

       my unhappy horses! What need did you have to be

down there among miserable humans, playthings of fate.

              You whom death cannot ambush, who will never grow old,

you are still tormented by disaster. People

have entangled you in their suffering.”—But

       for the endless calamity of death,

those two noble animals shed their tears.

 

Η ΠΟΛΙΣ

 

Είπες  «Θά πάγω σ’ άλλη γή, θά πάγω σ’ άλλη θάλασσα.

Μιά πόλις άλλη θά βρεθεί καλλίτερη από αυτή.

Κάθε προσπάθεια μου μιά καταδίκη είναι γραφτή

κ’ είν’ η καρδιά μου—σάν νεκρός—θαμένη.

Ο νούς μου ώς πότε μές στόν μαρασμό αυτόν θά μένει.

Όπου τό μάτι μου γυρίσω, όπου κι άν δώ

ερείπια μαύρα τής ζωής μου βλέπω εδώ,

πού τόσα χρόνια πέρασα καί ρήμαξα καί χάλασα.»

Καινούριους τόπους δέν θά βρείς, δέν θάβρεις άλλες θάλασσες.

Η πόλις θά σέ ακολουθεί. Στούς δρόμους θά γυρνάς

τούς ίδιους. Καί στές γειτονιές τές ίδιες θά γερνάς

καί μές στά ίδια σπίτια αυτά θ’ ασπρίζεις.

Πάντα στήν πόλι αυτή θά φθάνεις. Γιά τά αλλού—μήν ελπίζεις—

δέν έχει πλοίο γιά σέ, δέν έχει οδό.

Έτσι πού τή ζωή σου ρήμαξες εδώ

στήν κώχη τούτη τήν μικρή, σ όλην τήν γή τήν χάλασες.

THE CITY

You said:  “I’ll go to another land, to another sea;

I’ll find another city better than this one.

Every effort I make is ill-fated, doomed;

and my heart —like a dead thing—lies buried.

How long will my mind continue to wither like this?

Everywhere I turn my eyes, wherever they happen to fall

I see the black ruins of my life, here

where I’ve squandered, wasted and ruined so many years.”

New lands you will not find, you will not find other seas.

The city will follow you. You will return to the same streets.

You will age in the same neighborhoods; and in these

same houses you will turn gray. You will always

arrive in the same city. Don’t even hope to escape it,

there is no ship for you, no road out of town.

As you have wasted your life here, in this small corner

you’ve wasted it in the whole world.

ΤΡΩΕΣ

Είν’η προσπάθειές μας, τών συφοριασμένων

είν’ η προσπάθειές μας σάν τών Τρώων.

Κομμάτι κατορθώνουμε  κομμάτι

παίρνουμ’ επάνω μας κι αρχίζουμε

νάχουμε θάρρος καί καλές ελπίδες.

Μα πάντα κάτι βγαίνει καί μάς σταματά.

Ο Αχιλλεύς στήν τάφρον εμπροστά μας

βγαίνει καί μέ φωνές μεγάλες μάς τρομάζει.—

Είν’ η προσπάθειές μας σάν τών Τρώων,

Θαρούμε πώς μέ απόφασι καί τόλμη

θ’ αλλάξουμε τής τύχης τήν καταφορά,

κ’ έξω στεκόμεθα ν’ αγωνισθούμε.

Αλλ’ όταν η μεγάλη κρίσις έλθει,

η τόλμη κ’ η απόφασίς μας χάνονται

ταράττεται η ψυχή μας, παραλύει

κι ολόγυρα απ’ τα τείχη τρέχουμε

ζητώντας νά γλυτώσουμε μέ τήν φυγή.

Όμως η πτώσις μας είναι βεβαία. Επάνω,

στά τείχη, άρχισεν ήδη ο θρήνος.

Τών ημερών μας αναμνήσεις κλαίν κ’ αισθήματα.

Πικρά γιά μάς ο Πρίαμος κ’ η Εκάβη κλαίνε.

 

TROJANS

Our efforts are like those of the unfortunate;

like the efforts of the Trojans.

We succeed a bit; we regain

our confidence; and we start feeling

brave and having high hopes.

But always something comes up and stops us.

Achilles appears in front of us in the trench

and with loud shouts frightens us back.—

Our efforts are like those of the Trojans.

We think that with resolution and boldness

we can reverse the downhill course of fate,

and we stand outside ready to fight.

But when the great crisis comes,

our boldness and resolution vanish;

our soul is shaken, paralyzed;

and we run around the walls

trying to save ourselves by running away.

And yet our fall is certain. High up,

on the walls, the dirge has already started

mourning memories and auras of our days.

Priamos and Ekavi weep bitterly for us.

~English Translation by Manolis Aligizakis

~In your “Vernal Equinox” the presence of the ‘woman’, is evidently dominant. The erotic element almost alive characterizes your poetry, don’t you believe?

 

~All along I have believed that women are ‘The Beauty of Earth’ and can be looked that way via the prism of poetry not only as something virginal but also as the emancipated female. Images come to us from the ancient days describing the Kore as well as the Maiden with the same exquisite mastery. As the poet says:

 

      I only remember of the sea

      that sang between your legs

     proudly upholding

     the beauty of Earth

 

~You’ve lived in Canada for over thirty years. How have you matured as a poet and within what poetic trend does your poetry fit?

 

~My first influences were the famous twentieth century Greek masters, Cavafy, Seferis, Ritsos, Elytis, who I have not just read but studied in detail for the most part of my life from my early adulthood to today, but I have been also influenced by the world celebrated and awarded poets such as Neruda, Lorca, Eliot, Milosz, Whitman, Pound, and of course a few Canadian poets, Yates, Musgrove, Cohen, Lane. Elements of these poets’ works can be seen in my poetry, yet I can not confine my work into a specific trend. I write in both Greek and English with the same ease and I have discovered that when I write a poem in one language and then write it in the other, and again go back and write it for the second time in the original language the poem takes that beautiful, graceful form that I consider as its most eloquent.

 

~What deeper need prompted you into publishing a book of poetry in Greek in Greece?

 

~After a few publications in English in Canada, England and the USA, with some of them having certain success, and having received good response from the reading public as well as a few very positive reviews in all three countries I decided it was time to go back to the roots, to present my work in my homeland as though searching for the warmth hidden in the Greek psyche that I have for so long felt nostalgic about.

 

~Greece is going through some very difficult times these days, in the economic world as well as in the social fabric of the country. How a Hellene of diaspora sees this situation?

 

~The Hellene of diaspora is almost foreign to the plight the country has got into for various reasons. One of them is that he doesn’t live the reality of the situation and he’s also quite uniformed, or rather, misinformed, because he gets his news from the established mass media outlets that only present one side of the coin. The same mass media that informs the Greeks in Greece are the media of this country and in the western world in general, don’t think that the mass media issue is only a Greek problem it exists here in North America as well. Therefore the Hellene of diaspora not knowing what to do and how to help he opts for doing nothing.

 

~In your short story “The Enemy” you write… “I also live with this (hatred) for years but I learned how to control it.” Do you believe that art can reconcile man with the pain and agony of his soul?

 

~I truly believe that art, in whichever form it may be expressed, the written word for instance that I delve into or any other, elevates man a step higher than the everyday and brings him closer to touching the godly, liberating man from himself by helping him transcend the flesh. As far as my short story is concerned, yes, ‘the enemy’, the Turk passenger whom the Greek taxi driver drives to the airport is also a victim, like his driver, of the concepts of borders and history. They are both living beings who don’t hate each other on the contrary they just care to raise their families, each in their own way and with their own means. However they are caught in the swirls of history and the past wars. They both suffer from the same kind of disease.

 

~In a society the lives off and for commerce and money based mentality, where the social inequalities are so obviously perpetrated by cynicism and self centeredness, where one finds meaning in writing poetry?

 

~As I said before, I truly believe that art is the only medium, especially literature, through which the psycho-spiritual side of human beings can be uplifted to a high level of perception, thus liberating and refining the every day lives of the masses. We see today the catastrophic effects that consumerism has on man and to what extend it has affected today’s values and life, not only here in Greece, but the world over.

Let me ask why is it so important to buy a new car every three to four years, or why is it so necessary to have four television monitors in each home in the western world while we know there are millions of people who live on 1 or 2 dollars per day? Where one sees justice in that? While at the same time the rich western societies exploit and take advantage of the poor of the  world in an never ending scenario of the multinationals and the special interest groups controlling what we see, what we hear, what we believe, what we have to think?

In such a society what may be found that it may help the people break the shackles of that kind of slavery? Only one medium: ART. Because art takes man from his everyday struggle and fills him with calm and relaxation, thus transposing him to a different level and filling his thoughts with hope for a better future.

~Vangelis Serdaris

 

“Vernal Equinox”, ENEKEN 2011, Thessaloniki, Greece—A review

The most striking characteristic in Manolis’ poetry is the powerful, sensual reference to the female body. The body that takes the form and appearance of a woman-goddess, of a woman-provocateur, of a woman of lust, of the woman one searches for, the woman one loses, the woman who never yields, the woman one loves, the one who defines one’s dream, the woman who defines one’s dream of love and life. Clear-cut poetry, sharp, to the point, full of emotion, beautiful images, erotic interludes that never took place, nostalgia, tyrannizing ambivalence, the game of relationships and in its very center the craving for the female body. It is poetry of the distance between two people, of the exile that unfolds in a collective and sometimes individual mode, of a paradise, of the undoubtedly lost innocence.

 

 

~Vangelis Serdaris