Posts Tagged ‘Athens’

93119261_134154321279

I SPEAK

I speak of the last trumpeting of the defeated soldiers.
of the last rags from our festive garments
of our children who sell cigarettes to the passers-by.
I speak of the flowers that wilted on the graves and
rain rots them
of the houses gaping with no windows like toothless
skulls
of girls begging and showing the scars of their breasts.
I speak of the shoeless mothers who crawl among the ruins
of the conflagrated cities the corpses piled in
the streets
the pimps poets who during the night shiver by the front
steps.
I speak of the endless nights when the light is dimmed
at dawn
of the loaded trucks and the footsteps on the wet
cobblestones.
I speak of the prison yard and of the tear of the moribund.

But I speak more of the fishermen
who abandoned their nets and followed His steps
and when He got tired they didn’t rest
and when He betrayed them they didn’t reject Him
and when He was glorified they turned their eyes the other way
and their comrades spat at them and crucified them.
Though they, serene, took the road that had no end
and their glance didn’t ever darken nor bowed down
standing up and lonely amid the horrible loneliness of the crowd.

ΜΙΛΩ
Μιλώ για τα τελευταία σαλπίσματα των νικημένων στρατιωτών.
Για τα τελευταία κουρέλια από τα γιορτινά μας φορέματα.
Για τα παιδιά μας που πουλάν τσιγάρα στους διαβάτες.
Μιλώ για τα λουλούδια που μαραθήκανε στους τάφους
και τα σαπίζει η βροχή.
Για τα σπίτια που χάσκουνε δίχως παράθυρα σαν κρανία
ξεδοντιασμένα.
Για τα κορίτσια που ζητιανεύουνε δείχνοντας στα στήθια
τις πληγές τους.
Μιλώ για τις ξυπόλητες μάνες που σέρνονται στα χαλάσματα.
Για τις φλεγόμενες πόλεις τα σωριασμένα κουφάρια στους
δρόμους.
Τους μαστροπούς ποιητές που τρέμουνε τις νύχτες στα
κατώφλια.
Μιλώ για τις ατέλειωτες νύχτες όταν το φως λιγοστεύει τα
ξημερώματα.
Για τα φορτωμένα καμιόνια και τους βηματισμούς στις υγρές
πλάκες.
Για τα προαύλια των φυλακών και για το δάκρυ
των μελλοθανάτων.

Μα πιο πολύ μιλώ για τους ψαράδες.
Π’ αφήσανε τα δίχτυα τους και πήρανε τα βήματά Του.
Κι όταν Αυτός κουράστηκε αυτοί δεν ξαποστάσαν.
Κι όταν Αυτός τους πρόδωσε αυτοί δεν αρνηθήκαν.
Κι όταν Αυτός δοξάστηκε αυτοί στρέψαν τα μάτια.
Κι οι σύντροφοί τούς φτύνανε και τους σταυρώναν.
Κι αυτοί, γαλήνιοι, το δρόμο παίρνουνε π’ άκρη δεν έχει.
Χωρίς το βλέμμα τους να σκοτεινιάσει ή να λυγίσει.
Όρθιοι και μόνοι μες στη φοβερή ερημία του πλήθους.
~Μανώλη Αναγνωστάκη/Manolis Anagnostakis—μετάφραση Μανώλη Αλυγιζάκη/translated by Manolis Aligizakis

74001 3

ODYSSEY A

And when in his wide courtyards Odysseus had cut down
the insolent youths, he hung on high his sated bow
and strode to the warm bath to cleanse his bloodstained body.
Two slaves prepared his bath, but when they saw their lord
they shrieked with terror, for his loins and belly steamed
and thick black blood dripped down from both his murderous palms
their copper jugs rolled clanging on the marble tiles.
The wandering man smiled gently in his horny beard
and with his eyebrows signed the frightened girls to go.

ΟΔΥΣΣΕΙΑ Α

Σαν πια ποθέρισε τους γαύρους νιους μες στις φαρδιές αυλές του,
το καταχόρταστο ανακρέμασε δοξάρι του ο Δυσσέας
και διάβη στο θερμό λουτρό, το μέγα του κορμί να πλύνει.
Δυο δούλες συγκερνούσαν το νερό, μα ως είδαν τον αφέντη
μπήξαν φωνή, γιατι η σγουρή κοιλιά και τα μεριά του αχνίζαν
και μαύρα στάζαν αίματα πηχτά κι από τις δυο του φούχτες
και κύλησαν στις πλάκες οι χαλκές λαγήνες τους βροντώντας.
Ο πολυπλάνητος γελάει πραγά μες στα στριφτά του γένια
και γνέφει παίζοντας τα φρύδια του στις κοπελλιές να φύγουν.
Το χλιο πολληώρα φραίνουνταν νερό κι οι φλέβες του ξαπλώναν
μες το κορμί σαν ποταμοί, και τα νεφρά του δροσερεύαν
κι ο μέγας νους μες στο νερό ξαστέρωνε κι αναπαυόταν.

~ODYSSEY, by NIKOS KAZANTZAKIS, translated by KIMON FRIAR

Nikos Kazantzakis
1883-1957
Nikos Kazantzakis was born in Heraklion, Crete, when the island was still under Ottoman rule. He studied law in Athens (1902-06) before moving to Paris to pursue postgraduate studies in philosophy (1907-09) under Henri Bergson. It was at this time that he developed a strong interest in Nietzsche and seriously took to writing. After returning to Greece, he continued to travel extensively, often as a newspaper correspondent. He was appointed Director General of the Ministry of Social Welfare (1919) and Minister without Portfolio (1945), and served as a literary advisor to UNESCO (1946). Among other distinctions, he was president of the Hellenic Literary Society, received the International Peace Award in Vienna in 1956 and was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature.
Kazantzakis regarded himself as a poet and in 1938 completed his magnum opus, The Odyssey: A Modern Sequel, divided into 24 rhapsodies and consisting of a monumental 33,333 verses. He distinguished himself as a playwright (The Prometheus Trilogy, Kapodistrias, Kouros, Nicephorus Phocas, Constantine Palaeologus, Christopher Columbus, etc), travel writer (Spain, Italy, Egypt, Sinai, Japan-China, England, Russia, Jerusalem and Cyprus) and thinker (The Saviours of God, Symposium). He is, of course, best known for his novels Zorba the Greek (1946), The Greek Passion (1948), Freedom or Death (1950), The Last Temptation of Christ (1951) and his semi-autobiographical Report to Greco (1961). His works have been translated and published in over 50 countries and have been adapted for the theatre, the cinema, radio and television.

sefs_front

DENIAL

On the secluded seashore
white like a dove
we thirsted at noon;
but the water was brackish.

On the golden sand
we wrote her name;
when the sea breeze blew
the writing vanished.

With what heart, with what spirit
what desire and what passion
we led our life; what a mistake!
so we changed our life.
ΑΡΝΗΣΗ

Στο περιγιάλι το κρυφό
κι άσπρο σαν περιστέρι
διψάσαμε το μεσημέρι
μα το νερό γλυφό.

Πάνω στην άμμο την ξανθή
γράψαμε τ’ όνομά της
ωραία που φύσηξε ο μπάτης
και σβύστηκε η γραφή.

Με τί καρδιά, με τί πνοή,
τί πόθους και τί πάθος
πήραμε τη ζωή μας, λάθος!
Κι αλλάξαμε ζωή.

~George Seferis-Collected Poems, translated by Manolis Aligizakis, Libros Libertad, 2012

George Seferis_cover

ACTORS

We put up theaters and take them down
wherever we may find ourselves
we put up theaters and set the stage
yet our destiny always wins and

it sweeps them as it sweeps us
the actors and the actors’ director
the prompter and the musicians
scattered to the five hasty wings.

Flesh, mats, woods, make-up
rhymes, emotions, peplos, jewellery
masks, sunsets, wails, and yelling
and exclamations and sun risings

thrown amongst us in disarray
(where are we going? where are you going?)
exposed nerves over our skin
like the stripes of a zebra or an onager

naked and airy, dry and burning
(when were we born? when they buried us?)
and stretched like the strings
of a lyre that always buzzes. Look also

at our hearts; a sponge
dragged on the street and the bazaar
drinking the blood and the bile
of the tetrarch and of the thief

~Middle East, 1943

“George Seferis-Collected Poems”, translated by Manolis Aligizakis, Libros libertad, 2012
Book was short-listed at the National Greek Literary Awards, category translation, the highest Greek poetry recognition.

ΘΕΑΤΡΙΝΟΙ

Στήνουμε θέατρα και τα χαλνούμε
όπου σταθούμε κι όπου βρεθούμε
στήνουμε θέατρα και σκηνικά,
όμως η μοίρα μας πάντα νικά

και τα σαρώνει και μας σαρώνει
και τους θεατρίνους και το θεατρώνη
υποβολέα και μουσικούς
στους πέντε ανέμους τους βιαστικούς.

Σάρκες, λινάτσες, ξύλα, φτιασίδια,
ρίμες, αισθήματα, πέπλα, στολίδια,
μάσκες, λιογέρματα, γόοι και κραυγές
κι επιφωνήματα και χαραυγές

ριγμένα ανάκατα μαζί μ’ εμάς
(πες μου που πάμε; πες μου που πας;)
πάνω απ’ το δέρμα μας γυμνά τα νεύρα
σαν τις λουρίδες ονάγρου ή ζέβρα

γυμνά κι ανάερα, στεγνά στην κάψα
(πότε μας γέννησαν; πότε μας θάψαν;)
και τεντωμένα σαν τις χορδές
μιας λύρας που ολοένα βουίζει. Δες

και την καρδιά μας∙ ένα σφουγγάρι,
στο δρόμο σέρνεται και στο παζάρι
πίνοντας το αίμα και τη χολή
και του τετράρχη και του ληστή.

Μέση Ανατολή, Αύγουστος ’43

cavafy copy
SCULPTOR OF TYANA

As you may have heard, I am not a beginner.
Some good quantity of stone goes through my hands
and in my home country, Tyana, they know me
well; and here the senators have ordered
a number of statues from me.

Let me show you
some right now. Have a good look at this Rhea;
venerable, full of forbearance, really ancient.
Look closely at Pompey. Marius,
Aemilius Paulus, the African Scipio.
True resemblances, as true as I could make them.
Patroklos (I’ll have to touch him up a bit).
Close to those pieces
of yellowish marble over there, is Caesarion.

And for a while now I have been busy
creating a Poseidon. I carefully study
his horses in particular, how to shape them.
They have to be so light that their bodies,
their legs show that they don’t touch
the earth but run over water.

But here is my most beloved creation
that I worked with such feeling and great care
on a warm summer day
when my mind ascended to the ideals
I had a dream of him, this young Hermes.

~ Constantine Cavafy, translated by Manolis Aligizakis, Libros Libertad, 2011

ΤΥΑΝΕΥΣ ΓΛΥΠΤΗΣ

Καθώς που θα το ακούσατε, δεν είμ’ αρχάριος.
Κάμποση πέτρα από τα χέρια μου περνά.
Και στην πατρίδα μου, τα Τύανα, καλά
με ξέρουνε, κ’ εδώ αγάλματα πολλά
με παραγγείλανε συγκλητικοί.
Και να σας δείξω
αμέσως μερικά. Παρατηρείστ’ αυτήν την Ρέα
σεβάσμια, γεμάτη καρτερία, παναρχαία.
Παρατηρείστε τον Πομπήιον. Ο Μάριος,
ο Αιμίλιος Παύλος, ο Αφρικανός Σκιπίων.
Ομοιώματα, όσο που μπόρεσα, πιστά.
Ο Πάτροκλος (ολίγο θα τον ξαναγγίξω).
Πλησίον στου μαρμάρου, του κιτρινωπού
εκείνα τα κομμάτια, είν’ ο Καισαρίων.

Και τώρα καταγίνομαι από καιρό αρκετό
να κάμω έναν Ποσειδώνα. Μελετώ
κυρίως για τ’ άλογά του, πώς να πλάσσω αυτά.
Πρέπει ελαφρά έτσι να γίνουν που
τα σώματα, τα πόδια των να δείχνυον φανερά
που δεν πατούν την γη, μον τρέχουν στα νερά.

Μα να το έργον μου το πιο αγαπητό
που δούλεψα συγκινημένα και το πιο προσεκτικά
αυτόν, μια μέρα του καλοκαιριού θερμή
που ο νους μου ανέβαινε στα ιδανικά,
αυτόν εδώ ονειρευόμουν τον νέον Ερμή.

~ Constantine Cavafy, translated by Manolis Aligizakis, Libros Libertad, 2011

11167993_373787862810157_1549215843426208414_o

WATER WELL

Water-well springs to the foreground the matador’s blood that decorates goring horns of the bull and another opulent song dances on the white petals of the gardenia flower: save this moment before the irresistible Hades walks your way.

—You need to dig the garden but you watch TV all day long.

I drink the traditional bitter coffee while you lay in the coffin like a definition of exactly the opposite you ought to be yet when my time will arrive to fit in the width and length of the same casket you won’t return to drink my bitter coffee.

—You remember when you went hunting and the car engine froze on you?

Hoarfrost of April still around when the heartless Hades pierces my heart, the first swallows dance in the air and my mother covered the red eggs of Easter under the kitchen towel hiding them from my eyes.

—Get up and take the garbage to the sidewalk, you lazy bum.

And I beg Hades to bring you back to me, my beloved. His sardonic laughter a macabre omen and in the form of a song he whispers.

—Since I’ve left you alone your other half I needed to take: to balance the universe.

ΠΗΓΑΔΙ

Απ’το πηγάδι πηγάζει η ζωή του ταυρομάχου που το αίμα του στολίζει τα κέρατα του ταύρου που τον κάρφωσαν και τ’ οπάλινο τραγούδι χορεύει στα λευκά της γαρδένιας πέταλα: κράτησε τη στιγμή αυτη προτού ο ευδιάθετος Χάρος σε επιλέξει.

—Πρέπει να σκάψεις τον κήπο κι εσύ όλη μέρα χαζεύεις την τηλεόραση.

Πίνω τον παραδοσιακό πικρό καφέ κι εσύ κείτεσαι στο φέρετρο, ακριβής ορισμός του αντίθετου που μέλλουσουν να γίνεις κι όταν η ώρα μου έρθει κι εγώ να μετρήσω το μάκρος και το πλάτος του φερέτρου αυτού εσύ δεν θα `σαι `κει να πιεις τον πικρό καφέ σου.

—Θυμάσαι τότε που πήγες κυνήγι κι η μηχανή του αυτοκινήτου πάγωσε απ’ την παγωνιά;

Παγωνιά του Απρίλη που ο άκαρδος Χάρος την καρδιά μου πλήγωσε, τα πρώτα χελιδόνια χορεύουν στον αέρα κι η μάνα μου σκέπασε με μια πετσέτα τα κόκκινα Πασχαλινά αβγά για να τα κρύψει απ’ τα δυο λαίμαργά μου μάτια.

—Σήκω και βγάλε τα σκουπίδια στο δρόμο, τεμπέλη.

Κι εγώ το Χάρο παρακαλώ να σε γυρίσει πίσω, αγαπημένη μου. Γελά σαρδόνια και σαν τραγουδιστά μου ψυθιρίζει

—Σου χάρισα τη ζωή. Το έτερό σου ήμυσι έπρεπε να πάρω την ισορροπία να διατηρήσω.

~ OF REMORSES and REGRETS, Collection in progress, Vancouver, BC, 2015

11698589_410431962495253_250161418084392050_n

JULY

July the twenty second, eight thirty-five in the morning, the nightingale hides in the branches when Hades decides to push His arm deep in the jar of ostracons and bring up the one with my name written in capital letters…MANOLIS…with patience He sharpens His sickle on the stone as the jasmine reminds Him of a special fragrance and the chickadee sings our national anthem.

—I want to go on a holiday trip, faraway to some secluded romantic place.

He comes to my humble hovel when suddenly Atropos, Clotho and Lachesis toss His mind between a rock and a hard place, from north to south, it dons on him: enough men taken the last few hours.

—Don’t be concerned with your blood pressure: add a little salt it gives taste to the food.

He changes His mind. He flies to Bosnia where men line for the taking. He leaves and leaves me free in peace.

—Let’s go to Mexico where lovers go, like the two of us, eh baby?

Ostracon with my name written in capital letters is put back in the immense jar of ostracons,
like a cell of heart tissue to its muscle.

—If we put enough money away we can go onto a Caribbean cruise this September.
ΙΟΥΛΙΟΣ

Εικοσιδύο Ιουλίου, οχτώ και τριανταπέντε το πρωί, τ’ αηδόνι κρύβεται στα κλαδιά καθώς ο Χάρος αποφασίζει να βάλει το χέρι στη μεγάλη σακκούλα με τα όστρακα και διαλέξει εκείνο με τ’ όνομά μου με κεφαλαία γράμματα γραμμένο…ΜΑΝΩΛΗΣ…υπομονετικά το δρεπάνι του στην πέτρα ακονίζει καθώς το γιασεμί του υπενθυμίζει μια συγκεκριμένη ευωδία και το μαυροπούλι τραγουδάει τον εθνικό μας ύμνο.

—Θέλω να πάμε διακοπές σε κάποιο μέρος μακρινό και ρομαντικό.

Κι ο Χάρος το φτωχικό μου σπίτι επισκέπτεται όταν ξαφνικά η Κλωθώ, η Άτροπος κι η Λάχεσις του ταλανίζουν το μυαλό μεταξύ πέτρας και γρανίτη, απ’ τ’ανατολικά στα δυτικά, κι αποφαίνεται: αρκετούς τις τελευταίες ώρες πήρε.

—Μη σε στενοχωρεί η πίεσή σου, βάλε λίγο αλάτι ακόμα στο φαί, το νοστιμίζει.

Κι ο Χάρος τη γνώμη του αλλάζει και πετά μακριά στη Μπόσνια που στέκουν όλοι στη γραμμή να σκοτωθούν. Φεύγει και μ’ αφήνει λεύτερο στην ησυχία μου.

—Πάμε στο Μεξικό που πάνε οι εραστές σαν εμάς τους δυο μωρό μου, εντάξει;

Τ’ όστρακο με τ’ όνομά μου γραμμένο με κεφαλαία γράμματα ρίχνεται ξανά στη σακκούλα σαν κύτταρο μυώνα πίσω στην καρδιά.

—Αν αποταμιεύσουμε μερικά χρήματα θα πάμε το Σεπτέμβριο κρουαζιέρα στην Καραβαϊκή.

~REMORSES and EPIPHANIES, collection in Progress.

596717

Greece is about to be completely dismantled and fed to profit-hungry corporations

The latest bailout has nothing to do with debt, but an experiment in capitalism so extreme that no other EU state would even dare try it.
 
by Nick Dearden
 
Greece is heading towards its third “bailout”. This time €86 billion is on the table, which will be packaged up by international lenders with a bundle of austerity and sent off to Greece, only to return to those same lenders in the very near future.
 
We all know the spiraling debt cannot and will not be repaid. We all know the austerity to which it is tied will make Greece’s depression worse. Yet it continues.
 
If we look deeper, however, we find that Europe is not led by the terminally confused. By taking those leaders at their word, we’re missing what’s really going on in Europe. In a nutshell, Greece is up for sale, and its workers, farmers and small businesses will have to be cleared out of the way.
 
Under the eye-watering privatization program, Greece is expected to hand over its €50 billion of its “valuable state assets” to an independent body under the control of the European institutions, who will proceed to sell them off. Airports, seaports, energy systems, land and property – everything must go. Sell your assets, their contrived argument goes, and you’ll be able to repay your debt.
 
But even in the narrow terms of the debate, selling off profitable or potentially profitable assets leaves a country less able to repay its debts. Unsurprisingly the most profitable assets are going under the hammer first. The country’s national lottery has already been bought up. Airports serving Greece’s holiday islands look likely to be sold on-long-term lease to a German airport operator.
 
The port of Peireus looks likely to be sold to a Chinese shipping company. Meanwhile, 490,000 square meters of Corfu beachfront have been snapped up by a US private equity fund. It has a 99-year lease for the bargain price of €23million. According to reporters, the privatization fund is examining another 40 uninhabited islands as well as a massive project on Rhodes which includes an obligatory golf course.
 
Side-by-side with the privatization is a very broad program of deregulation which declares war on workers, farmers and small businesses. Greece’s many laws that protect small business such as pharmacies, bakeries, and bookshops from competition with supermarkets and big businesses are to be swept away. These reforms are so specific that the EU is writing laws on bread measurements and milk expiry dates. Incredibly, Greece is even being told to make its Sunday opening laws more liberal than Germany’s. Truly a free market experiment is being put into place.
 
On labor, pensions are to suffer rapid cuts, minimum wages are to be reduced and collective bargaining is to be severely curtailed while it is to become easier to sack staff. All of this is far more extreme that many of Greece’s “creditor” countries have implemented themselves. Changes to tax includes a massive hike to that most regressive of taxes VAT, on a wide range of products.
 
Of course, reforms in some areas of Greece’s economy might be a good idea, and indeed Syriza came to power promising to make serious reforms in, for instance, taxation and pensions. But what is being imposed by the lending institutions is not a series of sensible “reforms”, but the establishment and micromanagement of radical ‘free market’ economics.
 
The privatization and deregulation bonanza opens vast new swathes of Greek society to areas where big business has never been able to set foot before. The hope is that this will generate big profits to keep big business growing, as well as providing an extreme model of what might be possible throughout Europe. Although what’s even more distasteful than the hypocrisy of European leaders forcing policies onto Greece that they themselves have not dared to argue for in their own countries, is the cynicism of those same leaders imposing policies that will benefit their own country’s corporations.
 
The intensity of the restructuring program currently being agreed for Greece should dispel any lingering notion that this is a well intentioned but misguided attempt to deal with a debt crisis. It is a cynical attempt to set up a corporate paradise in the Mediterranean, and must be resisted at all costs.
 
Source:
 http://dithen2010.blogspot.ca/

182446-nekriprosfygaslampedusa

DROWN WOMAN

With the sorrowful events that recently take place in Kos, Greece, the Facebook team “We say no to the Golden Dawn” posted the above photograph of a dead migrant woman raised from a boat that sank on October 2013 in the open sea outside the Italian island of Lambedousa.
The Facebook post writes the following:
“She was found floating on the waves as she is in this picture with her mobile phone, her wallet with a few small bills and pictures of her loved ones back home clenched onto her chest. She wouldn’t let the waves take away her only possessions, her beloved persons back home she didn’t want to feel alone the moment she felt the cold and death approaching.
There are many dead people on the shore. Many have no name. The news people talk of numbers, hundreds and hundreds of dead. No one knows their names. Who they’ve left behind? From whom they run away? What were their dreams? And when one says “the boats sink” this woman, this mother holds her dreams tight onto her breast.

“Let us remain…HUMAN”

~Translated from the Greek by Manolis Aligizakis

Με αφορμή τα θλιβερά περιστατικά που σημειώνονται τις τελευταίες ημέρες στην Κω, η ομάδα στο Facebook «Λέμε Όχι στη Χρυσή Αυγή» ανάρτησε μια φωτογραφία που ανήκει σε νεκρή πρόσφυγα που ανασύρθηκε από ναυάγιο που σημειώθηκε τον Οκτώβριο του 2013 στ’ ανοικτά της νήσου Λαμπεντούζα, στις ακτές της Ιταλίας.
Η σχετική ανάρτηση της ομάδας στο Facebook γράφει χαρακτηριστικά:
«Την βρήκαν στα κύματα έτσι, με το κινητό και το πορτοφόλι με τα λίγα λεφτά και τις φωτογραφίες των αγαπημένων της προσώπων στο στήθος. Δεν ήθελε να αφήσει στα κύματα της θάλασσας τα αγαπημένα της υπάρχοντα, δεν ήθελε να νιώσει μόνη τη στιγμή που αισθάνθηκε το κρύο και τον θανάτο να πλησιάζουν.
Υπάρχουν πολλά πτώματα στην παραλία. Πολλοί από αυτούς δεν έχουν ούτε ένα όνομα. Τα tg μιλάνε για αριθμούς, εκατοντάδες και εκατοντάδες νεκροί. Κανείς δεν ξέρει ποιοι είναι,ποιους άφησαν σπίτι, από τι τρέχουν, ποια ήταν τα όνειρά τους. Και όταν κάποιος λέει «βουλιάζουμε τα ποταμόπλοια» αυτή η γυναίκα, η μητέρα, , πιέζει ακόμα πιο δυνατά στο στήθος τα όνειρά της.
Ας παραμείνουμε ‘ΑΝΘΡΩΠΟΙ’…».

Ritsos_front large

PUNISHMENT

One day time takes its revenge on behalf of all
the embittered people;
one day the beautiful braggarts with the curly hair and black
mustaches are punished
with the muscular bodies, the big hands, the leather bracelets on
their left wrists
the ones in the ships’ holds or the gas stations with their long pipes
the ones on Saturday nights with the sad zembeikikos dance with the
heavy eyelids and with the knife
the ones with the gold watches who never check the time. They get punished.
Lard hangs from their bellies. Bit by bit their hair falls
off their thighs and calves. The ships leave. They don’t take them.
One night
with a washed out crossed-eyed glance in the fully lit central
plaza they see Him passing
He who still retains the beautiful, truthful smile of the most bitter
life and the song
they have all forgotten and which only He whistles. The worst
of all is
they don’t understand their severe punishment and for this
they age faster and more severely in their unwashed houses with
the old spiders.

ΤΙΜΩΡΙΑ

Μια μέρα, ο χρόνος παίρνει την εκδίκησή του για λογαριασμό των πικρα-
μένων,
μια μέρα τιμωρούνται οι ωραίοι αλαζόνες με τα βοστρυχωτά μαλλιά, τα
μαύρα μουστάκια,
τα μυώδη σώματα, τα φαρδιά χέρια, τα πέτσινα βραχιόλια στο ζερβή
καρπό τους,
αυτοί σ’ αμπάρια καραβιών ή σε πρατήρια βενζίνας με μακριούς σωλήνες,
αυτοί, τα Σαββατόβραδα, με το βαρύ ζεμπέϊκικο, με τα βαριά ματόκλαδα
και το μαχαίρι,
αυτοί με τα χρυσά ρολόγια που ποτέ δεν κοιτάζουν την ώρα. Τιμωρούνται.
Ξίγκια κρεμάνα στην κοιλιά τους. Λίγο λίγο το τρίχωμα μαδάει
στα μεριά και στις κνήμες τους. Φεύγουν τα καράβια. Δεν τους παίρνουν.
Μια νύχτα
βλέπουν με ξέθωρο αλλήθωρο βλέμμα μες στη φωταψία της κεντρικής λεω-
φόρου να περνάει
αυτός που ακόμη διατηρεί το ωραίο, αλάνθαστο χαμόγελο της πιο πικρής
ζωής και το τραγούδι
εκείνο που όλοι το ξεχάσαν και που μόνος αυτός το σφυρίζει. Το χειρότερο
απ’ όλα
είναι που δεν καταλαβαίνουν τη βαθιά τους τιμωρία, και γι αυτό
πιο γρήγορα και πιο άσκημα γερνούν μέσα σε άπλυτα σπίτια με τις γριές
αράχνες.

~ “Yannis Ritsos-Selected Poems”, Ekstasis Editions, summer 2013
Poetry by Yannis Ritsos, Translated by Manolis Aligizakis