Posts Tagged ‘Athens’

93119261_134154321279

I SPEAK

I speak of the last trumpeting of the defeated soldiers.
of the last rags from our festive garments
of our children who sell cigarettes to the passers-by.
I speak of the flowers that wilted on the graves and
rain rots them
of the houses gaping with no windows like toothless
skulls
of girls begging and showing the scars of their breasts.
I speak of the shoeless mothers who crawl among the ruins
of the conflagrated cities the corpses piled in
the streets
the pimps poets who during the night shiver by the front
steps.
I speak of the endless nights when the light is dimmed
at dawn
of the loaded trucks and the footsteps on the wet
cobblestones.
I speak of the prison yard and of the tear of the moribund.

But I speak more of the fishermen
who abandoned their nets and followed His steps
and when He got tired they didn’t rest
and when He betrayed them they didn’t reject Him
and when He was glorified they turned their eyes the other way
and their comrades spat at them and crucified them.
Though they, serene, took the road that had no end
and their glance didn’t ever darken nor bowed down
standing up and lonely amid the horrible loneliness of the crowd.

ΜΙΛΩ
Μιλώ για τα τελευταία σαλπίσματα των νικημένων στρατιωτών.
Για τα τελευταία κουρέλια από τα γιορτινά μας φορέματα.
Για τα παιδιά μας που πουλάν τσιγάρα στους διαβάτες.
Μιλώ για τα λουλούδια που μαραθήκανε στους τάφους
και τα σαπίζει η βροχή.
Για τα σπίτια που χάσκουνε δίχως παράθυρα σαν κρανία
ξεδοντιασμένα.
Για τα κορίτσια που ζητιανεύουνε δείχνοντας στα στήθια
τις πληγές τους.
Μιλώ για τις ξυπόλητες μάνες που σέρνονται στα χαλάσματα.
Για τις φλεγόμενες πόλεις τα σωριασμένα κουφάρια στους
δρόμους.
Τους μαστροπούς ποιητές που τρέμουνε τις νύχτες στα
κατώφλια.
Μιλώ για τις ατέλειωτες νύχτες όταν το φως λιγοστεύει τα
ξημερώματα.
Για τα φορτωμένα καμιόνια και τους βηματισμούς στις υγρές
πλάκες.
Για τα προαύλια των φυλακών και για το δάκρυ
των μελλοθανάτων.

Μα πιο πολύ μιλώ για τους ψαράδες.
Π’ αφήσανε τα δίχτυα τους και πήρανε τα βήματά Του.
Κι όταν Αυτός κουράστηκε αυτοί δεν ξαποστάσαν.
Κι όταν Αυτός τους πρόδωσε αυτοί δεν αρνηθήκαν.
Κι όταν Αυτός δοξάστηκε αυτοί στρέψαν τα μάτια.
Κι οι σύντροφοί τούς φτύνανε και τους σταυρώναν.
Κι αυτοί, γαλήνιοι, το δρόμο παίρνουνε π’ άκρη δεν έχει.
Χωρίς το βλέμμα τους να σκοτεινιάσει ή να λυγίσει.
Όρθιοι και μόνοι μες στη φοβερή ερημία του πλήθους.
~Μανώλη Αναγνωστάκη/Manolis Anagnostakis—μετάφραση Μανώλη Αλυγιζάκη/translated by Manolis Aligizakis

Advertisements

74001 3

ODYSSEY A

And when in his wide courtyards Odysseus had cut down
the insolent youths, he hung on high his sated bow
and strode to the warm bath to cleanse his bloodstained body.
Two slaves prepared his bath, but when they saw their lord
they shrieked with terror, for his loins and belly steamed
and thick black blood dripped down from both his murderous palms
their copper jugs rolled clanging on the marble tiles.
The wandering man smiled gently in his horny beard
and with his eyebrows signed the frightened girls to go.

ΟΔΥΣΣΕΙΑ Α

Σαν πια ποθέρισε τους γαύρους νιους μες στις φαρδιές αυλές του,
το καταχόρταστο ανακρέμασε δοξάρι του ο Δυσσέας
και διάβη στο θερμό λουτρό, το μέγα του κορμί να πλύνει.
Δυο δούλες συγκερνούσαν το νερό, μα ως είδαν τον αφέντη
μπήξαν φωνή, γιατι η σγουρή κοιλιά και τα μεριά του αχνίζαν
και μαύρα στάζαν αίματα πηχτά κι από τις δυο του φούχτες
και κύλησαν στις πλάκες οι χαλκές λαγήνες τους βροντώντας.
Ο πολυπλάνητος γελάει πραγά μες στα στριφτά του γένια
και γνέφει παίζοντας τα φρύδια του στις κοπελλιές να φύγουν.
Το χλιο πολληώρα φραίνουνταν νερό κι οι φλέβες του ξαπλώναν
μες το κορμί σαν ποταμοί, και τα νεφρά του δροσερεύαν
κι ο μέγας νους μες στο νερό ξαστέρωνε κι αναπαυόταν.

~ODYSSEY, by NIKOS KAZANTZAKIS, translated by KIMON FRIAR

Nikos Kazantzakis
1883-1957
Nikos Kazantzakis was born in Heraklion, Crete, when the island was still under Ottoman rule. He studied law in Athens (1902-06) before moving to Paris to pursue postgraduate studies in philosophy (1907-09) under Henri Bergson. It was at this time that he developed a strong interest in Nietzsche and seriously took to writing. After returning to Greece, he continued to travel extensively, often as a newspaper correspondent. He was appointed Director General of the Ministry of Social Welfare (1919) and Minister without Portfolio (1945), and served as a literary advisor to UNESCO (1946). Among other distinctions, he was president of the Hellenic Literary Society, received the International Peace Award in Vienna in 1956 and was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature.
Kazantzakis regarded himself as a poet and in 1938 completed his magnum opus, The Odyssey: A Modern Sequel, divided into 24 rhapsodies and consisting of a monumental 33,333 verses. He distinguished himself as a playwright (The Prometheus Trilogy, Kapodistrias, Kouros, Nicephorus Phocas, Constantine Palaeologus, Christopher Columbus, etc), travel writer (Spain, Italy, Egypt, Sinai, Japan-China, England, Russia, Jerusalem and Cyprus) and thinker (The Saviours of God, Symposium). He is, of course, best known for his novels Zorba the Greek (1946), The Greek Passion (1948), Freedom or Death (1950), The Last Temptation of Christ (1951) and his semi-autobiographical Report to Greco (1961). His works have been translated and published in over 50 countries and have been adapted for the theatre, the cinema, radio and television.

sefs_front

DENIAL

On the secluded seashore
white like a dove
we thirsted at noon;
but the water was brackish.

On the golden sand
we wrote her name;
when the sea breeze blew
the writing vanished.

With what heart, with what spirit
what desire and what passion
we led our life; what a mistake!
so we changed our life.
ΑΡΝΗΣΗ

Στο περιγιάλι το κρυφό
κι άσπρο σαν περιστέρι
διψάσαμε το μεσημέρι
μα το νερό γλυφό.

Πάνω στην άμμο την ξανθή
γράψαμε τ’ όνομά της
ωραία που φύσηξε ο μπάτης
και σβύστηκε η γραφή.

Με τί καρδιά, με τί πνοή,
τί πόθους και τί πάθος
πήραμε τη ζωή μας, λάθος!
Κι αλλάξαμε ζωή.

~George Seferis-Collected Poems, translated by Manolis Aligizakis, Libros Libertad, 2012

George Seferis_cover

ACTORS

We put up theaters and take them down
wherever we may find ourselves
we put up theaters and set the stage
yet our destiny always wins and

it sweeps them as it sweeps us
the actors and the actors’ director
the prompter and the musicians
scattered to the five hasty wings.

Flesh, mats, woods, make-up
rhymes, emotions, peplos, jewellery
masks, sunsets, wails, and yelling
and exclamations and sun risings

thrown amongst us in disarray
(where are we going? where are you going?)
exposed nerves over our skin
like the stripes of a zebra or an onager

naked and airy, dry and burning
(when were we born? when they buried us?)
and stretched like the strings
of a lyre that always buzzes. Look also

at our hearts; a sponge
dragged on the street and the bazaar
drinking the blood and the bile
of the tetrarch and of the thief

~Middle East, 1943

“George Seferis-Collected Poems”, translated by Manolis Aligizakis, Libros libertad, 2012
Book was short-listed at the National Greek Literary Awards, category translation, the highest Greek poetry recognition.

ΘΕΑΤΡΙΝΟΙ

Στήνουμε θέατρα και τα χαλνούμε
όπου σταθούμε κι όπου βρεθούμε
στήνουμε θέατρα και σκηνικά,
όμως η μοίρα μας πάντα νικά

και τα σαρώνει και μας σαρώνει
και τους θεατρίνους και το θεατρώνη
υποβολέα και μουσικούς
στους πέντε ανέμους τους βιαστικούς.

Σάρκες, λινάτσες, ξύλα, φτιασίδια,
ρίμες, αισθήματα, πέπλα, στολίδια,
μάσκες, λιογέρματα, γόοι και κραυγές
κι επιφωνήματα και χαραυγές

ριγμένα ανάκατα μαζί μ’ εμάς
(πες μου που πάμε; πες μου που πας;)
πάνω απ’ το δέρμα μας γυμνά τα νεύρα
σαν τις λουρίδες ονάγρου ή ζέβρα

γυμνά κι ανάερα, στεγνά στην κάψα
(πότε μας γέννησαν; πότε μας θάψαν;)
και τεντωμένα σαν τις χορδές
μιας λύρας που ολοένα βουίζει. Δες

και την καρδιά μας∙ ένα σφουγγάρι,
στο δρόμο σέρνεται και στο παζάρι
πίνοντας το αίμα και τη χολή
και του τετράρχη και του ληστή.

Μέση Ανατολή, Αύγουστος ’43

cavafy copy
SCULPTOR OF TYANA

As you may have heard, I am not a beginner.
Some good quantity of stone goes through my hands
and in my home country, Tyana, they know me
well; and here the senators have ordered
a number of statues from me.

Let me show you
some right now. Have a good look at this Rhea;
venerable, full of forbearance, really ancient.
Look closely at Pompey. Marius,
Aemilius Paulus, the African Scipio.
True resemblances, as true as I could make them.
Patroklos (I’ll have to touch him up a bit).
Close to those pieces
of yellowish marble over there, is Caesarion.

And for a while now I have been busy
creating a Poseidon. I carefully study
his horses in particular, how to shape them.
They have to be so light that their bodies,
their legs show that they don’t touch
the earth but run over water.

But here is my most beloved creation
that I worked with such feeling and great care
on a warm summer day
when my mind ascended to the ideals
I had a dream of him, this young Hermes.

~ Constantine Cavafy, translated by Manolis Aligizakis, Libros Libertad, 2011

ΤΥΑΝΕΥΣ ΓΛΥΠΤΗΣ

Καθώς που θα το ακούσατε, δεν είμ’ αρχάριος.
Κάμποση πέτρα από τα χέρια μου περνά.
Και στην πατρίδα μου, τα Τύανα, καλά
με ξέρουνε, κ’ εδώ αγάλματα πολλά
με παραγγείλανε συγκλητικοί.
Και να σας δείξω
αμέσως μερικά. Παρατηρείστ’ αυτήν την Ρέα
σεβάσμια, γεμάτη καρτερία, παναρχαία.
Παρατηρείστε τον Πομπήιον. Ο Μάριος,
ο Αιμίλιος Παύλος, ο Αφρικανός Σκιπίων.
Ομοιώματα, όσο που μπόρεσα, πιστά.
Ο Πάτροκλος (ολίγο θα τον ξαναγγίξω).
Πλησίον στου μαρμάρου, του κιτρινωπού
εκείνα τα κομμάτια, είν’ ο Καισαρίων.

Και τώρα καταγίνομαι από καιρό αρκετό
να κάμω έναν Ποσειδώνα. Μελετώ
κυρίως για τ’ άλογά του, πώς να πλάσσω αυτά.
Πρέπει ελαφρά έτσι να γίνουν που
τα σώματα, τα πόδια των να δείχνυον φανερά
που δεν πατούν την γη, μον τρέχουν στα νερά.

Μα να το έργον μου το πιο αγαπητό
που δούλεψα συγκινημένα και το πιο προσεκτικά
αυτόν, μια μέρα του καλοκαιριού θερμή
που ο νους μου ανέβαινε στα ιδανικά,
αυτόν εδώ ονειρευόμουν τον νέον Ερμή.

~ Constantine Cavafy, translated by Manolis Aligizakis, Libros Libertad, 2011