Posts Tagged ‘άβυσσος’

ubermensch_cover800px-Nietzsche187a

Nietzsche’s Übermensch: A Hero of Our Time?

Eva Cybulska dispells popular misconceptions about this controversial figure.

“Man is a rope, fastened between animal and Übermensch – a rope over an abyss.”

~Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Prologue

The term Übermensch, often translated as Superman or Overman, was not invented by Nietzsche. The concept of hyperanthropos can be found in the ancient writings of Lucian. In German, the word had already been used by Müller, Herder, Novalis, Heine, and most importantly by Goethe in relation to Faust (in Faust, Part I, line 490). In America Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote of the Over-soul, and, perhaps with the exception of Goethe’s Faust, his aristocratic, self-reliant ‘Beyond-man’ was probably the greatest contributor to Nietzsche’s idea of the Übermensch. Nietzsche was, however, well familiar with all the above sources.
The first public appearance of Nietzsche’s Übermensch was in his book Thus Spoke Zarathustra (1883-5). As a teenager Nietzsche had already applied the word Übermensch to Manfred, the lonely Faustian figure in Byron’s poem of the same name who wanders in the Alps tortured by some unspoken guilt. Having challenged all authoritative powers, he dies defying the religious path to redemption. Nietzsche’s affinity with Manfred culminated in him composing a piano duet called Manfred Meditation, which he sent to his musical hero, the conductor Hans von Bülow. The maestro’s verdict on this ‘masterpiece’ as “the most irritating musical extravagance” put a decisive end to Nietzsche’s career as a music composer.
For Nietzsche, the idea of Übermensch was more like a vision than a theory. It suddenly surfaced in his consciousness during the memorable summer of 1881 in Sils-Maria (Swiss Alps), born out of that epiphanic experience that also gave rise to Eternal Return, Zarathustra and God is Dead. It was a timeless moment of ecstasy at the boundary between the conscious and the unconscious, of past and present, of pain and elation. Nietzsche entered his own inferno in “the middle of life, so surrounded by death”, haunted by memories of his father’s death, and also of his shattered friendship with Wagner, the most significant relationship in his life. He never explained what he meant by Übermensch, only intimated:
“The Übermensch shall be the meaning of the earth!
I entreat you my brethren, remain true to the earth, and do not believe those who speak to you of supra-terrestrial hopes! …
Behold, I teach you the Übermensch: he is this lightning, he is this madness! …
Behold, I am a prophet of the lightning and a heavy drop from the cloud: but this lightning is called Übermensch.”
Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Prologue
Nietzsche’s reluctance to spell out exactly what he meant has provoked numerous interpretations in the secondary literature. Hollingdale (in Nietzsche) saw in Übermensch a man who had organised the chaos within; Kaufmann (Nietzsche) a symbol of a man that created his own values, and Carl Jung (Zarathustra’s Seminars) a new ‘God’. For Heidegger it represented humanity that surpassed itself, whilst for the Nazis it became an emblem of the master race.
There have been problems with translating Übermensch. It has been rendered as a ‘Beyond-man’ (Tille, 1896), ‘Superman’ (G.B. Shaw, 1903) and ‘Overman’ (Kaufmann, 1954). The difficulty hinges on the prefix über (over, above, beyond) and ultimately the word proves untranslatable. Although it is gender-indifferent, for the sake of simplicity I shall be using a masculine pronoun in its stead.
What the Übermensch is Not
“Above all do not confuse me with what I am not!”
Ecce Homo
The Übermensch is not a Nazi. Nietzsche’s anti-semitic sister Elisabeth invited Hitler to her brother’s shrine in Weimar in 1934 and essentially made an offering of his philosophy. The Führer, who never read the philosopher’s works, took to the selected snippets that Elisabeth provided like a proverbial fish to water and adopted the Übermensch as a symbol of a master-race. Little did he know that Nietzsche had written that he “would have all anti-Semites shot”, not to mention his strong anti-nationalistic and pan-European tendencies. Provocatively, he also talked of himself as “the last anti-political German” (Ecce Homo, Why I am so Wise).
Some anarchists appropriated Übermensch to their cause, latching onto its aspects of strength and individualism. But Nietzsche never advocated abolishment of the state or legislation in pursuit of selfish aims. Quite the opposite: he argued for a well-ordered soul and a well-ordered society.
Übermensch is not a tyrant. If anything, he is someone capable of tyranny who manages to overcome and sublimate this urge. His magnanimity stems not from weakness and servitude, but from the strength of his passions. He is rather like “the Roman Caesar with Christ’s soul” (Will to Power; 983), a value-creating and value-destroying free spirit who disciplines himself to wholeness. It’s important to stress that there has never yet been an Übermensch; it remains an ideal.

Ο Νίτσε και η θεωρία του υπεράνθρωπου
Πίστευε ότι η γερμανική κουλτούρα είναι ό,τι ανώτερο είχε να παρουσιάσει το ανθρώπινο πνεύμα του καιρού του. Και θεωρούσε τον εαυτό του ως τον πιο επιφανή εκπρόσωπο της γερμανικής σκέψης. Δε φαντάστηκε ποτέ του ότι μπορεί και να τον αφορούσαν τα λόγια του Σοπενχάουερ, που τόσο θαύμαζε και τόσο είχε επηρεαστεί από τη φιλοσοφία του:
«Η ζωή είναι μια αστείρευτη πηγή ηλιθιότητας».
Η υπέροχη λογική του Φρειδερίκου Νίτσε κονταροχτυπιόταν συνεχώς με τον άνθρωπο Νίτσε, τις φοβίες, τις αδυναμίες και τα πάθη του. Παρ’ όλο που είχε την ίδια με τους αναρχικούς προγονική φιλοσοφική αφετηρία, κατάφερε να γίνει το ιδεολογικό άλλοθι πρώτα των εκπροσώπων του ανερχόμενου καπιταλισμού και των στυγνών εκμεταλλευτών κι έπειτα του ναζισμού. Δεν έζησε να δει την πραγματικότητα. Πέθανε παράφρονας σε μια ψυχιατρική κλινική, στα 56 του χρόνια. Οπαδοί και πολέμιοι, υποκλίθηκαν στην πνευματική του δύναμη.
Γεννήθηκε στη Γερμανία, στις 15 Οκτωβρίου του 1844. Ήταν μόλις πέντε χρόνων, όταν έχασε τον πάστορα πατέρα του. Για να τα βγάλει πέρα, η μητέρα του τον πήρε μαζί με την αδερφή του και μετακόμισαν στης γιαγιάς του, όπου έμενε και κάποια θεία του. Ο μικρός Φρειδερίκος μεγάλωνε όντας το μοναδικό αρσενικό ανάμεσα σε τέσσερις γυναίκες που τον έπνιγαν με την αγάπη και τις φροντίδες τους. Από τότε, αντιπάθησε τις γυναίκες κι αισθανόταν μίσος για την κηδεμονία τους, την οποία όμως θεωρούσε αναγκαία.
Ξέφυγε προσωρινά στα 14, το 1858, όταν γράφτηκε στην ανθρωπιστική σχολή Πφόρτα, όπου βυθίστηκε στη μελέτη των αρχαίων Ελλήνων συγγραφέων. Συνέχισε με θεολογικές κι έπειτα φιλολογικές σπουδές, πέρασε ένα χρόνο στο πανεπιστήμιο της Βόννης και κατέληξε φοιτητής φιλοσοφίας στο αρχαίο πανεπιστήμιο της Λειψίας. Ήταν 25 χρόνων, στα 1869, όταν ανέλαβε καθηγητής της αρχαίας ελληνικής φιλοσοφίας στη Βασιλεία της Ελβετίας.
Στην ελβετική μεγαλούπολη έμεινε έντεκα χρόνια, γνωρίστηκε και συνδέθηκε με τον επαναστάτη μουσουργό Ρίχαρντ Βάγκνερ και τον ιστορικό της Αναγέννησης Ιακώβ Μπόχαρντ, τσακώθηκε με τον πρώτο, συνέχισε να θαυμάζει τον δεύτερο και διεύρυνε τον κύκλο των γνωριμιών του, ενώ παράλληλα ξεκίνησε την τεράστια συγγραφική και φιλοσοφική παραγωγή του.
Οι αντιλήψεις του διατυπώνονταν κυρίως με αφορισμούς και με έντονη ποιητική πνοή. Τάραζαν τα νερά και προκαλούσαν οξύτατες συζητήσεις και κριτικές. Παρ’ όλα αυτά, δεν μπορούσε να ανεχθεί ότι υπήρχαν άλλοι που είχαν κύρος κι απολάμβαναν δημοτικότητα, ενώ αυτός όχι. Απομονώθηκε. Κάποιοι έντονοι πονοκέφαλοι του κατέτρωγαν τον χρόνο, ενώ η όρασή του άρχισε προοδευτικά να μειώνεται. Κατάντησε σχεδόν τυφλός.
Στα 1879, εγκατέλειψε την έδρα της αρχαίας ελληνικής φιλοσοφίας, προσπάθησε να ανοιχτεί στην κοινωνία, γρήγορα απογοητεύτηκε από τους ανθρώπους και ξαναγύρισε στη μοναξιά του μη βρίσκοντας κανέναν άξιο να τον συναναστραφεί. Η υγεία του κάπως καλυτέρευσε την περίοδο 1882 – 1884, αλλ’ ο ίδιος θύμωνε με τον εαυτό του, που ήταν υποχρεωμένος να παίρνει μύριες προφυλάξεις και να μετακινείται κάθε χειμώνα στην παραλία της Νίκαιας και κάθε καλοκαίρι στα ελβετικά υψίπεδα.
Η διετία 1887 – 1888 τον βρήκε να συγγράφει με μανία, αλλά στο τέλος της δεύτερης χρονιάς μια κρίση τον έριξε στο κρεβάτι. Συνήλθε. Το χτύπημα ήρθε το 1889 με μιαν οξύτατη κρίση παραφροσύνης. Μάνα κι αδερφή έσπευσαν να τον μαζέψουν και να τον περιθάλψουν. Για λίγα χρόνια. Μετά, κατέληξε σε μια ψυχιατρική κλινική της Βαϊμάρης, όπου και πέθανε στις 25 Αυγούστου του 1900.

Szymborska_2011_(1)

ADVERTISEMENT

I am a tranquilizer.
I am effective at home.
I work well at the office
I take exams
I appear in court
I carefully mend broken crockery—
all you need do it take me
dissolve me under the tongue
all you need do is swallow me
just wash me down with water.

I know how to cope with misfortune
how to endure bad news
take the edge of injustice
make up for the absence of God
help pick out your widow’s weeds
What are you waiting for—
have faith in chemistry’s compassion.

You’re still a young man/woman
you really should settle down somehow.
Who said
life must be loved courageously?

Hand your abyss over to me—
I will line it with soft sleep
You’ll be grateful for
the four-footed landing.

Sell me your soul.
There’s no other buyer likely to turn up.

There’s no other devil left.

ΔΙΑΦΗΜΗΣΗ

Είμαι ναρκωτικό.
Επιδρώ καλά όταν με πιείς στο σπίτι.
Επιδρώ θετικά και στο γραφείο
περνάω εξετάσεις
παρουσιάζομαι στο δικαστήριο
ξανακολλώ σπασμένα κατσαρολικά—
μόνο πρέπει να με πιείς
να λυώσω κάτω απ’ τη γλώσσα σου
μόνο να με καταπιείς
με μια γουλιά νερό

Γνωρίζω να αναιρώ την ατυχία
να υπομένω τα δυσάρεστα νέα
να κάνω πιο ομαλή την αδικία
να εξαλείφω την έλλειψη του Θεού
να ελαφρύνω τον πόνο της χήρας
τί περιμένεις—
έχε εμπιστοσύνη στη συμπόνια της χημείας

Είσαι ακόμα νέα/νέος
καιρός να κατασταλλάξεις κάπου.
Ποιος είπε
ότι πρέπει να ζούμε τη ζούμε με θάρρος;

Έλα δώσε μου την άβυσσό σου
θα την απαλύνω με τον ύπνο
θα μ’ ευγνωμονείς
για την στα τέσσερα προσγείωσή σου

Πούλησέ μου την ψυχή σου.
Δεν υπάρχει άλλος αγοραστής.

THE PROFESSOR WALKS AGAIN

The professor has already died three times.
After the first death he was told to move his head.
After the second death he was told to sit up.
After the third he was even stood on his feet,
propped up by a stout and robust nanny:
let’s go for a nice walk now.

the brain has been badly damaged in an accident
look, it’s just a miracle the problems he’s overcome:
left right, light dark, tree grass, hurts eat.

Two plus two, professor?
Two, says the professor.
This time the answer’s better than before.

Hurts, grass, sit, bench.
And at the end of the path, once again, old as time,
cheerless, pallid,
thrice banished
the nanny they say is the real one.

The professor is just dying to be with her.
Once again he pulls away from us.

Ο ΚΑΘΗΓΗΤΗΣ ΠΕΡΠΑΤΕΙ ΞΑΝΑ

Ο καθηγητής έχει πεθάνει τρεις φορές κιόλας.
Μετά τον πρώτο θάνατο του είπαν να κουνήσει το κεφάλι του.
Μετά τη δεύτερο θάνατο του είπαν να ανακάτσει.
Μετά την τρίτη φορά σηκωνόταν όρθιος
με τη βοήθεια της σθεναρής κι εποίμονης νοσοκόμας:
ας πάμε για ένα ωραίο περίπατο τώρα.

Ο εγκέφαλος είχε τραυματιστεί άσχημα απ’ το ατύχημα
κοίταξε, είναι θαύμα που ξεπέρασε όλες τις δυσκολίες:
αριστερό – δεξί, φως – σκοτάδι, δέντρο – γρασίδι, πονάει – τρώγε.

Δύο και δύο πόσα κάνουν, κύριε καθηγητά;
Δύο, απαντά εκείνος.
Αυτή τη φορά η απάντηση είναι καλύτερη από πριν.

Πονάει, γρασίδι, κάθησε, παγκάκι.
Και στο τέλος του μονοπατιού, ξανά, γέρος σαν τον χρόνο
αγέλαστος, κατάχλωμος
τρεις φορές τιμωρημένος
η νοσοκόμα αυτή είναι, λένε, είναι η καλύτερη.

Ο καθηγητής πεθαίνει να ` ναι μαζί της.
Για μια φορά ακόμα φεύγει μακριά μας.
RETURNS

He came home. Said nothing.
Through it was clear something unpleasant had happened.
Put his head under the blanket.
Drew up his knees.
He’s about forty, but not at this moment.
He exists—but only as in his mother’s belly
seven layers deep, in protective darkness.
Tomorrow he will give a lecture on homeostasis
in megagalactic cosmonautics.
For now he’s curled up, fallen asleep.

ΓΥΡΙΣΜΟΣ

Γύρισε στο σπίτι. Δεν είπε λέξη.
Παρ’ όλο που ήταν φανερό
ότι κάτι άσχημο είχε συμβεί.
Έχωσε το κεφάλι του κάτω απ’ την κουβέρτα.
Δίπλωσε τα πόδια του.
Είναι γύρω στα σαράντα αλλά όχι αυτή τη στιγμή.
Υπάρχει μόνο στης μάνας του την κοιλιά
μέσα σε επτά στρώματα προστατευτικό σκότος.
Αύριο θα δώσει μία διάλεξη για την ομοιοστατική
σε γιγάντιους γαλαξίες και κοσμοναυτική.
Για την ώρα έχει κουρνιάσει, και κοιμάται.

Maria Wisława Anna Szymborska (2 July 1923 – 1 February 2012) was a Polish poet, essayist, translator and recipient of the 1996 Nobel Prize in Literature. Born in Prowent, which has since become part of Kórnik, she later resided in Kraków until the end of her life. She is described as a “Mozart of Poetry”. In Poland, Szymborska’s books have reached sales rivaling prominent prose authors: although she once remarked in a poem, “Some Like Poetry” (“Niektórzy lubią poezję”), that no more than two out of a thousand people care for the art.
Szymborska was awarded the 1996 Nobel Prize in Literature “for poetry that with ironic precision allows the historical and biological context to come to light in fragments of human reality”. She became better known internationally as a result of this. Her work has been translated into English and many European languages, as well as into Arabic, Hebrew, Japanese and Chinese.
Wisława Szymborska was born on 2 July 1923 in Prowent, Poland (now part of Kórnik, Poland), the daughter of Wincenty and Anna (née Rottermund) Szymborski. Her father was at that time the steward of Count Władysław Zamoyski, a Polish patriot and charitable patron. After the death of Count Zamoyski in 1924, her family moved to Toruń, and in 1931 to Kraków, where she lived and worked until her death in early 2012
When World War II broke out in 1939, she continued her education in underground classes. From 1943, she worked as a railroad employee and managed to avoid being deported to Germany as a forced labourer. It was during this time that her career as an artist began with illustrations for an English-language textbook. She also began writing stories and occasional poems. Beginning in 1945, she began studying Polish literature before switching to sociology at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków. There she soon became involved in the local writing scene, and met and was influenced by Czesław Miłosz. In March 1945, she published her first poem “Szukam słowa” (“Looking for words”) in the daily newspaper, Dziennik Polski. Her poems continued to be published in various newspapers and periodicals for a number of years. In 1948, she quit her studies without a degree, due to her poor financial circumstances; the same year, she married poet Adam Włodek, whom she divorced in 1954 (they remained close until Włodek’s death in 1986). Their union was childless. Around the time of her marriage she was working as a secretary for an educational biweekly magazine as well as an illustrator. Her first book was to be published in 1949, but did not pass censorship as it “did not meet socialist requirements”. Like many other intellectuals in post-war Poland, however, Szymborska adhered to the People’s Republic of Poland’s (PRL) official ideology early in her career, signing an infamous political petition from 8 February 1953, condemning Polish priests accused of treason in a show trial.[9][10][11] Her early work supported socialist themes, as seen in her debut collection Dlatego żyjemy (That is what we are living for), containing the poems “Lenin” and “Młodzieży budującej Nową Hutę” (“For the Youth who are building Nowa Huta”), about the construction of a Stalinist industrial town near Kraków. She became a member of the ruling Polish United Workers’ Party.
Like many communist intellectuals initially close to the official party line, Szymborska gradually grew estranged from socialist ideology and renounced her earlier political work. Although she did not officially leave the party until 1966, she began to establish contacts with dissidents. As early as 1957, she befriended Jerzy Giedroyc, the editor of the influential Paris-based emigré journal Kultura, to which she also contributed. In 1964, she opposed a Communist-backed protest to The Times against independent intellectuals, demanding freedom of speech instead.[12]
In 1953, Szymborska joined the staff of the literary review magazine Życie Literackie (Literary Life), where she continued to work until 1981 and from 1968 ran her own book review column, called Lektury Nadobowiązkowe. Many of her essays from this period were later published in book form. From 1981–83, she was an editor of the Kraków-based monthly periodical, NaGlos (OutLoud). In the 1980s, she intensified her oppositional activities, contributing to the samizdat periodical Arka under the pseudonym “Stańczykówna”, as well as to the Paris-based Kultura. The final collection published while Szymborska was still alive, Dwukropek, was chosen as the best book of 2006 by readers of Poland’s Gazeta Wyborcza.[4] She also translated French literature into Polish, in particular Baroque poetry and the works of Agrippa d’Aubigné. In Germany, Szymborska was associated with her translator Karl Dedecius, who did much to popularize her works there.
~WIKIPEDIA

Βισλάβα Συμπόρσκα–Βιογραφία

Η Βισουάβα Σιμπόρσκα (Wislawa Szymborska) γεννήθηκε το 1923 στο Κούρνικ της Πολωνίας (περιοχή της επαρχίας Πόζναν) κι από εκεί μετακινήθηκε στα οκτώ της χρόνια στην Κρακοβία, τόπο μόνιμης διαμονής της έκτοτε, ως το θάνατό της, την 1η Φεβρουαρίου του 2012, σε ηλικία 88 ετών. Σπούδασε φιλολογία και κοινωνιολογία στο φημισμένο πανεπιστήμιο της πόλης και εμφανίστηκε για πρώτη φορά στην ποίηση το 1945. Μέχρι το 1996, που της απονεμήθηκε το βραβείο Νόμπελ Λογοτεχνίας, είχε εκδώσει μόλις εννέα ποιητικές συλλογές και τέσσερα βιβλία με δοκίμια, ενώ μετέφρασε έμμετρη γαλλική ποίηση και για ένα διάστημα (1967-1972) σχολίαζε τακτικά άσημους μάλλον ξένους και Πολωνούς λογοτέχνες. Τιμήθηκε με το Φιλολογικό Βραβείο της Κρακοβίας (1995), το Πολωνικό Κρατικό Βραβείο για την Τέχνη (1963), το Βραβείο Γκαίτε (1991) και το Βραβείο Χέρντερ (1995) και υπήρξε διδάκτορας της Τέχνης, τιμής ένεκεν, στο Πανεπιστήμιο του Πόζναν. Ανήκει μαζί με τους Ζμπίγκνιεβ Χέρμπερτ και Ταντέους Ρουζέβιτς στην κορυφή της πυραμίδας των μεταπολεμικών εκπροσώπων της λεγόμενης “Πολωνικής σχολής της ποίησης”, παρότι η αναγνώρισή της στην Ευρώπη, και ιδιαίτερα στον αγγλοσαξονικό χώρο έγινε πολύ αργότερα απ’ αυτούς.

Η Σιμπόρσκα από νωρίς διαγράφει το ποιητικό της κλίμα, γράφοντας ότι “δανείζεται λέξεις που βαραίνουν από πάθος και μετά προσπαθεί να τις κάνει να δείχνουν ελαφρές”. Η κλασικότροπη κομψότητα στον χειρισμό και την ανάπτυξη του ποιητικού της υλικού συνδυάζεται με μιαν ανάλαφρη προσέγγιση των πραγμάτων και έναν απατηλά εύθυμο σκεπτικισμό, όπου υφέρπει η επώδυνη συνείδηση της ανθρώπινης συνθήκης και περιπέτειας στον κόσμο, αλλά και η ζωντανή, εις πείσμα της θνητής μας μοίρας και της ιστορίας (όπου επαναλαμβάνεται συνήθως η τραγωδία), ελπίδα. Γιατί, για τη Σιμπόρσκα, ο κόσμος, παρά την ανασφάλεια, τον φόβο και το μίσος που εκτρέφει και καλλιεργεί η ανθρώπινη φύση μας, δεν παύει να προκαλεί και να εκπλήσσει, κι η φύση μαζί με την τέχνη παραμένουν πάντοτε οι καλύτεροι μεσίτες γι’ αυτό το όραμα (όπως κατέληξε στην εκδήλωση για την απονομή του Νόμπελ: “Οι ποιητές, φαίνεται, θα έχουν πάντοτε πολλή δουλειά”).

Κάποια από τα ποιήματα της Σιμπόρσκα, γραμμένα σε ανύποπτο χρόνο, αποκτούν μια δραματική επικαιρότητα σήμερα που ολόκληρη η ανθρωπότητα βιώνει το άγχος της τρομοκρατίας με μοναδική ένταση, και είναι δείγματα της βαθιάς ηθικής συνείδησης και εγρήγορσης που διατρέχει τελικά όλο το ποιητικό της έργο.

~Translation from the English into Greek by Manolis Aligizakis